Airport retailers face losses due to pandemic | United to maximize ventilation during boarding, deplaning | Air travel volume falls for the first time since April
July 23, 2020
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Retail and food outlets at US airports are facing billions in losses amid the coronavirus pandemic. The Airport Restaurant and Retail Association says many businesses at airports are likely to close permanently. "The current trajectory... will usher in a wave of permanent restaurant and retail closures that will turn bustling airports once pulsing with energy into ‘ghost towns’ even after travel recovers," the association said.
Full Story: Forbes (7/20) 
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United Airlines will implement new procedures to maximize air flow volume on high-efficiency particulate air filtration systems during boarding and deplaning on all mainline aircraft to help further reduce the spread of COVID-19. "We know the environment on an aircraft is safe and because the air flow is designed to minimize the transmission of disease, the earlier we maximize air flow over our HEPA filtration system, the better for our crew and our customers," CEO Scott Kirby said.
Full Story: United Hub (7/20) 
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The Transportation Security Administration screened 4.65 million people at airport checkpoints in the week that ended July 19, a 4% drop from the previous week and the first decrease since air travel began to slowly come back in April. Airline executives attribute the decrease to an uptick in coronavirus infections and quarantine measures adopted by some states.
Full Story: CNBC (7/20),  TravelPulse (7/20) 
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Southwest Airlines, Delta and JetBlue are among carriers that have reserved space in aircraft to accommodate social distancing, while United Airlines has continued to fill its aircraft to capacity. Airlines are caught between the need to generate revenue and travelers' concerns regarding the coronavirus.
Full Story: The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (7/21) 
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Southwest and American Airlines have expanded their face covering requirements to apply throughout the airport areas they operate and will not allow exceptions for any passenger over two-years-old. Southwest also said that it will try out thermal screening at Dallas Love Field, its home airport.
Full Story: Reuters (7/22),  Las Vegas Review-Journal (tiered subscription model) (7/22),  American Airlines American Stories (7/22) 
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Delta Air Lines is sharing about developments in touchless technology for travelers, including facial recognition available in several cities. Use of biometrics is optional and Delta says customers' privacy will be protected.
Full Story: Delta News Hub (7/15) 
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Be in the Know Before You Travel
Now frequent fliers can enjoy peace of mind with App in the Air. To help make traveling today more seamless, the app has launched new features that allow you to search country restrictions, airport and airline requirements and key health search filters when booking flights and hotels. Learn more here!
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Refuel and Refresh
Snake massage anyone? See these unusual spa treatments
Relaxing in a beer bath (AFP/Getty Images)
Wine or beer baths, immersion in hay and a massage that makes use of snakes are among the unique spa treatments highlighted on this list. The Hotel Hershey in Pennsylvania offers chocolate-based treatments, including its Chocolate-Dipped Strawberry Immersion.
Full Story: Fodor's (7/20) 
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From The Ritz Paris with its bar named for Ernest Hemingway to the Chelsea Hotel in New York City that Patti Smith used as a setting for her book "Just Kids," a sampling of notable hotels for literature lovers is served up by travel writer Kaitlyn McInnis. The Willard InterContinental in Washington, D.C., claims Mark Twain, Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson as past guests.
Full Story: Forbes (7/22) 
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Travel Pulse
Should COVID-19 testing be a requirement for flying?
Yes.
 65.48%
No.
 28.55%
I don't know.
 5.97%
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Don't be afraid to give up the good to go for the great.
John D. Rockefeller,
business magnate, philanthropist
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