Milky Way may devour more gas than it releases | Oobleck behavior predicted in 3D model | Researchers learn more about viral DNA by studying koala retrovirus
October 14, 2019
SIGMAXI SmartBrief
Your World of Science News
SIGN UP ⋅   FORWARD
Top Story
Milky Way may devour more gas than it releases
Milky Way may devour more gas than it releases
(Mariana Suarez/AFP/Getty Images)
The Milky Way is consuming more gas than it is expelling, according to findings published in The Astrophysical Journal. Researchers used data from the Hubble Space Telescope to make their calculations and suspect some of the extra mass may be from the intergalactic medium.
Gizmodo (10/11) 
LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Email
 
Science in the News
Oobleck behavior predicted in 3D model
Researchers have developed a 3D mathematical model that predicts whether oobleck, a non-Newtonian fluid, will behave like a liquid or a solid. "[T]he rules that govern how this material flows are very nuanced," says Ken Kamrin, an author of the study published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
ScienceAlert (Australia) (10/11) 
LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Email
Researchers learn more about viral DNA by studying koala retrovirus
Genetic activity in koalas may provide a unique window into evolutionary processes, say researchers who asked whether a defective version of retrovirus in a population of marsupials provides protection against diseases such as chlamydia. Researchers are focusing on the role of piRNAs, bits of RNA that deactivate endogenous retroviruses.
The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (10/10) 
LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Email
MIT uses 3D printing to vindicate da Vinci bridge design
The Ottoman Empire rejected Leonardo da Vinci's bridge design in the early 1500s, but the Renaissance Man now has vindication thanks to MIT. Researchers used 3D printing to create the blocks for a 1:500-scale replica to prove the viability of the da Vinci design -- a flattened arch to allow masted vessels to pass beneath and wings at each end to brace against winds.
Popular Mechanics online (10/10),  Gizmodo (10/10) 
LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Email
Light-based device removes carbon monoxide from blood in animal tests
Scientists at the University of Pittsburgh have developed a device that uses red light to remove carbon monoxide from the blood and oxygenate it in tests involving rats, according to a study in the journal Science Translational Medicine. The device pumps blood from a vein in the leg through a porous membrane where it is exposed to red light.
The Scientist online (10/9) 
LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Email
Veterans with PTSD more likely to exhibit sleep disorder
Veterans diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder are at higher risk of developing REM sleep behavior disorder, or RBD, than nonveterans, according to findings published in Sleep. RBD is marked by thrashing, which can cause injury to the individual or their partner, and may be linked to Parkinson's disease, researchers say.
Psych Central (10/13) 
LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Email
Chemo, new therapy combo shows promise in pediatric neuroblastoma
Researchers examined 43 children with high-risk neuroblastoma who underwent six rounds of chemotherapy combined with an antibody therapy similar to dinutuximab and found that 76% had some tumor regression after two rounds of treatment, while nearly 86% remained relapse-free after two years, compared with only 50% of those who didn't receive antibody therapy in a previous study. The findings were published in the journal Clinical Cancer Research.
HealthDay News (10/10) 
LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Email
Funding Watch
NSF issues $2.4M grant to Fla. consortium for minority women in STEM
Five universities in the Florida Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate will use a $2.4 million grant from the National Science Foundation to support minority women in doctoral, post-doctoral, and early-career STEM fields. The alliance will conduct research camps in north, central and south Florida and raise awareness among faculty and students.
WUSF-FM (Tampa, Fla.) (10/9) 
LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Email
Sigma Xi News
Overcoming Politics and Mistrust to Build Public Trust in Science
Sigma Xi Executive Director and CEO Jamie Vernon shares his insights about a new report on the American public's trust in scientists, and areas of opportunity for organizations like Sigma Xi to build public trust. The Society is ready to move forward; the Board of Directors has approved the establishment of the Committee on Scientific Conduct and Professional Ethics.
LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Email
Why We Need Water Ethics
A values-based framework can guide water policy decisions that are both practical and moral.
LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Email
Learn more about Sigma Xi:
Sigma Xi | American Scientist | Become an Affiliate
Become a Member | Contact Us
  
  
The world, unfortunately, rarely matches our hopes and consistently refuses to behave in a reasonable manner.
Stephen Jay Gould,
paleontologist, evolutionary biologist, writer
LinkedIn Twitter Facebook Email
  
  
 
Sign Up
SmartBrief offers 200+ newsletters
Advertise
Learn more about the SmartBrief audience
Subscriber Tools:
Contact Us:
Advertising  -  Tom Sikes
Editor  -  Paula Kiger
Mailing Address:
SmartBrief, Inc.®, 555 11th ST NW, Suite 600, Washington, DC 20004
© 1999-2019 SmartBrief, Inc.®
Privacy Policy (updated May 25, 2018) |  Legal Information