FBR president: Decision to let chimps age in place is in their best interest | Rhesus monkeys may be good models for Bardet-Biedl syndrome research | Fetal human brains have cells mice, monkeys lack
October 30, 2019
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FBR president: Decision to let chimps age in place is in their best interest
Veterinarians have recommended that 44 chimpanzees remain at Alamogordo Primate Facility in New Mexico because they are too old or sick to be transported safely. The chimps have established social groups and access to the outdoors, and the decision "is in the best interest of these elderly and frail animals," says FBR President Matthew R. Bailey. "The chimpanzees will live out their days in Alamogordo, where ... they have forged close bonds with their social groups and their caretakers," Bailey said.
Science (tiered subscription model) (10/24) 
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Research Breakthroughs
Rhesus monkeys may be good models for Bardet-Biedl syndrome research
A genetic mutation that causes Bardet-Biedl syndrome occurs naturally in rhesus monkeys as well as humans, causing blindness, kidney failure and extra digits, researchers reported in Experimental Eye Research. The finding suggests studies of the rare condition in rhesus monkeys could help researchers identify cell and gene therapies for BBS as well as treatments for other forms of retinitis pigmentosa.
Drug Target Review (U.K.) (10/28) 
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Fetal human brains have cells mice, monkeys lack
The rhombic lip of fetal human brains contains human-specific transient progenitor cells that neither mouse nor macaque brains contain, and the rhombic lip takes longer to develop in humans, according to a study published in Science. The cells are the source of most neurons in human brains, and findings underscore key differences that translational research should account for.
Forbes (10/28) 
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Salty diet linked to poor cognition, tau buildup in brains of mice
Salty diet linked to poor cognition, tau buildup in brains of mice
(Pixabay)
After two months on a high-salt diet, lab mice were unable to recognize new objects and were slower to navigate a maze than mice on a regular diet. The high-salt diet increased the abundance of T cells in the mice's guts, which caused a nitric oxide deficit and tau protein to accumulate in their brains, the researchers reported in Nature.
New Scientist (free content) (10/23) 
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Animal Health
Study finds link between feline virus, liver cancer
Study finds link between feline virus, liver cancer
(Pixabay)
A study published in Viruses found an association between domestic cat hepadnavirus and certain types of feline hepatitis and liver cancer, and the finding might bring about new treatments and vaccines, says researcher Julia Beatty, a professor of feline medicine. The findings mirror a link between hepatitis B and liver cancer in humans, Beatty said.
Vet Practice Magazine (Australia) (10/28) 
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Dog Aging Project getting underway
Veterinarians, geneticists, biostatisticians and other researchers with the Dog Aging Project are enrolling 10,000 pet dogs to follow for 10 years or longer to identify biological and environmental factors that contribute to healthy aging, and their findings might apply to human medicine. Pet dogs are prone to some of the same diseases as humans, some treatments work in both humans and dogs, and dogs are good research subjects because they age seven to 10 times faster than humans.
VIN News Service (Veterinary Information Network) (10/28) 
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Treatment for drug overdoses cures turtles exposed to toxic algae
Treatment for drug overdoses cures turtles exposed to toxic algae
(Jody Amiet/AFP/Getty Images)
Intravenous lipid emulsion therapy, which involves injecting a fatty solution into the bloodstream, reversed signs of toxicity within 24 hours in sea turtles that had been exposed to Karenia brevis algae, which cause red tides that strand and kill many sea turtles each year. The therapy, which is used to treat overdoses in people, causes toxins to bind to the fats instead of to organs.
Miami Herald (tiered subscription model) (10/26) 
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Policy News
US shutters zoonotic disease research, training program
The US Agency for International Development is ending the Predict zoonotic disease research program, begun a decade ago after an outbreak of H5N1 avian influenza. More than 1,000 virus strains were discovered and thousands of people were trained to help prevent disease outbreaks in developing countries.
The Scientist online (10/28),  The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (10/25) 
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FBR News
FBR resource: Animal Research Perceptions vs. Reality
FBR resource: Animal Research Perceptions vs. Reality
Animal rights groups mislead the public about animal research, but FBR is fighting back with facts. In this resource, highly respected neuro-oncologist and FBR Board Vice-Chair Dr. Henry S. Friedman refutes myths surrounding animal research with scientific evidence and sets the record straight on the reality and benefits of animal research. Check it out. The brochure is also available in Spanish. Check out Investigación Animal Percepciones vs. Realidad.
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About FBR
The Foundation for Biomedical Research (FBR) is the nation’s oldest and largest non-profit dedicated to improving human and animal health by promoting public understanding and support for biomedical research. Our mission is to educate people about the essential role animal research plays in the quest for medical advancements, treatments and cures for both people and animals.
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