Scientific evidence on CBD needed before veterinary use | Be honest with veterinarians about marijuana | Pets aren't a source of COVID-19, veterinarian says
August 24, 2020
Animal Health SmartBrief
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Veterinary Medicine Update
Dogs and cats are much more sensitive to the effects of tetrahydrocannabinol than people are, and the danger is compounded when combined with artificial sweeteners, chocolate and other ingredients in edible cannabis products, according to AVMA President Dr. Douglas Kratt. Researchers are studying the potential benefits of cannabidiol, but products now on the market are not regulated and don't always contain what the label indicates, Dr. Kratt says.
Full Story: WGN-AM (Chicago) (8/21) 
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Ingestion of marijuana can cause depression, balance and coordination problems, seizures and death in pets, says veterinarian Dr. Jose Arce, AVMA president-elect. People who suspect their pet has eaten marijuana should be honest with their veterinarian so appropriate treatment can begin immediately, Dr. Arce says.
Full Story: KOMO-TV/KOMO-AM (Seattle) (8/21) 
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Only a few of the fewer than 40 pets worldwide diagnosed with a SARS-CoV-2 infection have shown any clinical signs of illness, and there is no evidence any person has caught the virus from a pet, says AVMA past-President Dr. John Howe. The coronavirus vaccine that is recommended for puppies is for a different coronavirus, Dr. Howe says.
Full Story: WGN-TV (Chicago) (8/21) 
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Wildfire smoke in California's Central Valley has degraded air quality to the point that exercising pets outdoors could cause respiratory problems. "I often will tell people, if it's not good enough for you outside, because it's too hot, too cold, or if the air quality is not good enough, then it's not good enough for your pets," said veterinarian Jessica Loweth.
Full Story: KSEE-TV/KGPE-TV (Fresno, Calif.) (8/22) 
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Ticks carrying the pathogen that causes Lyme disease can be as small as a poppy seed and hide behind pets' ears and between their toes, but routine tick preventives protect both pets and people, says veterinarian Leigh Hofmeister. Lyme disease is treatable in pets if caught early, but clinical signs may be vague and include lethargy, lack of appetite and limping.
Full Story: WKBN-TV/WYFX-TV (Youngstown, Ohio) (8/22) 
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Animal News
The Monterey County, Calif., SPCA has found or rescued more than 600 animals affected by wildfires and is relocating to the county fairgrounds. Pets should be microchipped, their vaccinations should be kept current, and owners should have a list of pet-friendly accommodations in case evacuation orders are issued, says SPCA spokesperson Beth Brookhouser.
Full Story: The Californian (Salinas, Calif.) (tiered subscription model) (8/22) 
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Policy Watch
Ballots in Denver will include a question asking whether to repeal the city's ban on ownership of pit bull-type dogs and require a restricted license instead. The city council in neighboring Aurora, Colo., recently voted against a similar ballot measure and instead will consider giving municipal judges more flexibility in deciding how to handle incidents involving animals considered aggressive.
Full Story: The Denver Post (tiered subscription model) (8/22) 
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Around the Office
No matter which lender you are applying to, there are a handful of documents needed to support a loan application, writes Amanda Parness, CEO of Spring Advisory Services. Prepare everything from your quarterly profit and loss statements, realistic forecasts, aged accounts payable and receivable balances, as well as tax returns, advises Parness.
Full Story: Forbes (8/21) 
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AVMA Today
As irritating as smoke can be to people, it can cause health problems for animals as well. Smoke from wildfires and other large blazes affects pets, horses, livestock and wildlife. If you can see or feel the effects of smoke yourself, you also should take precautions to keep your animals -- both pets and livestock -- safe. The AVMA has developed a web page with tips and resources to help protect animals from the dangers of wildfire smoke. View AVMA's "Wildfire Smoke and Animals" web page.
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In order to realize the worth of the anchor we need to feel the stress of the storm.
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The news summaries appearing in Animal Health SmartBrief are based on original information from news organizations and are produced by SmartBrief, Inc., an independent e-mail newsletter publisher. The AVMA is not responsible for the content of sites that are external to the AVMA. Linking to a website does not constitute an endorsement by the AVMA of the site or the information presented on the site. Questions and comments should be directed to SmartBrief at avma@smartbrief.com.
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