Maine teachers learn about slavery, state history | Teachers share tips for curbing talking in class | How are states using funds for at-risk students?
August 9, 2019
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Teaching & Learning
Maine teachers learn about slavery, state history
Maine teachers learn about slavery, state history
(Pixabay)
A group of Maine teachers recently spent two days at the Holocaust and Human Rights Center of Maine learning about African-American history and slavery in the state and how to teach the information to students. Keynote speaker Shay Stewart-Bouley, leader of a civil-rights organization, shared her experiences and told attendees about the "conditional" acceptance of people of color in a dominate white culture.
Kennebec Journal (Maine) (8/7) 
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Policy Watch
How are states using funds for at-risk students?
How are states using funds for at-risk students?
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Most states are using foundational funding formulas to distribute money to school districts for special student populations according to an Education Commission of the States report. Only eight states have models that specifically address funding for at-risk students from low-income households, the data shows.
Education Week (tiered subscription model) (8/6) 
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Technology in the Classroom
ISTE CEO lists top edtech challenges
ISTE CEO lists top edtech challenges
(Pixabay)
There are five key education-technology issues that educators should consider as 2020 approaches, suggests Richard Culatta, CEO of the International Society for Technology in Education. They include a shift from coding instruction to a focus on computational thinking and a new focus on what it means to be a digital citizen.
Education Week (tiered subscription model) (8/6) 
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Social Studies & Civic Life
How lateral reading can help ID fake news stories
How lateral reading can help ID fake news stories
(Pixabay)
Students who practice lateral reading, in which they stop to verify information that seems suspect rather than glossing over it, will get better at identifying untrustworthy news stories, according to media literacy expert Frank Baker. In this blog post, Baker recommends that teachers post lists of questions for students to keep in mind while reading news articles, such as who might benefit from the story and whether it's possible to contact the writer.
MiddleWeb (8/7) 
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Program helps students create civic change
Students who take part in the Center for Citizenship and Social Responsibility program in Medford, Mass., come up with ideas for projects that will improve the community. The center, funded by a Michael Bloomberg Foundation grant, supports K-12 students as they brainstorm, plan and complete civic improvement projects such as improving playgrounds and encouraging water conservation.
Patch/Medford, Mass. (8/7) 
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