Blood test for cancer being developed for pets, people | Researchers observe early cell differentiation in lab-grown monkey embryos | Scientists build a better skin graft that connects with blood vessels in mice
November 6, 2019
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Blood test for cancer being developed for pets, people
Blood test for cancer being developed for pets, people
(Pixabay)
Veterinarian Heather Wilson-Robles, chair of comparative oncology at Texas A&M's College of Veterinary Medicine, is working with scientists at a Texas startup on a specific nucleosomic blood test to detect a variety of cancers in humans and dogs. Blood samples to develop the veterinary test are collected during unrelated veterinary exams from pet dogs whose owners give permission.
The Eagle (Bryan, Texas) (11/2) 
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Research Breakthroughs
Researchers observe early cell differentiation in lab-grown monkey embryos
Two research groups in China report in Science that they grew cynomolgus monkey embryos in their labs for 20 days and observed several processes, including gastrulation, or the process of cells differentiating into different organ and tissue types. The research is likely to renew debate on guidelines limiting the length of time human embryos may be grown in labs and spur more interest in developing human-monkey chimeras for research.
Nature (free content) (10/31) 
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Scientists build a better skin graft that connects with blood vessels in mice
3D-printed skin grafted onto a mouse connected with blood vessels, researchers reported in Tissue Engineering Part A, and future work includes editing graft cells using CRISPR to prevent tissue rejection, says lead researcher Pankaj Karande. Scientists combined human endothelial and pericyte cells with rat collagen and other cells to make the bio-ink, which formed vascular networks a few weeks after printing.
Newsweek (11/4),  Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (11/4) 
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Experimental double-sided tape binds wounds quickly
Experimental double-sided tape binds wounds quickly
(Pixabay)
Suturing wounds stresses skin and is associated with infection risk and scarring, but an experimental double-sided tape that binds tissues and has performed well in animal tests might offer an alternative in the future, according to a study published in Nature. The tape bound tissue faster than glues and worked for attaching implantable medical devices to the heart and other tissues.
HealthDay News (10/31) 
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Other News
Animal Health
FDA approves generic version of canine anti-anxiety med
FDA approves generic version of canine anti-anxiety med
(Pixabay)
The FDA approved clomipramine hydrochloride, a generic version of Clomicalm, for use along with behavioral training in dogs with separation anxiety. About 40% of dogs referred for behavioral training have separation anxiety, which may lead to inappropriate urination and defecation, vocalization, destructiveness, aggression, or excessive licking and chewing, according to the AVMA.
NBC News (10/30) 
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Researchers study CBD to treat canine bladder cancer
Researchers at the University of Guelph's Ontario Veterinary College are leading a three-year study on the effects of cannabidiol on canine bladder cancer. Bladder cancer is highly invasive, resists treatment and cannot be surgically resected in dogs, says study leader and veterinarian Sam Hocker.
CBC News (Canada) (11/3) 
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Policy News
Senate committee approves bill to bolster tick-borne disease research
A bill sponsored by Sens. Susan Collins, R-Maine, and Tina Smith, D-Minn., would direct HHS to develop a national strategy against tick-borne diseases that includes bolstering prevention efforts and research on diagnostic and treatment methods. The bill, named for former Sen. Kay Hagan, D-N.C., who recently died of Powassan virus, was approved by a committee and sent to the full Senate for a vote.
The Associated Press (11/3) 
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MD Anderson chief medical exec likely to be FDA commissioner nominee
University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center radiation oncology professor Stephen Hahn is likely to be the nominee to serve as FDA commissioner, replacing acting commissioner Ned Sharpless. Hahn is also chief medical executive at MD Anderson, where he helps manage a $5.2 billion operating budget and 20,300 employees.
CNN (11/2),  The Washington Post (tiered subscription model) (11/1) 
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FBR News
FBR resource: Animal Research Perceptions vs. Reality
FBR resource: Animal Research Perceptions vs. Reality
Animal rights groups mislead the public about animal research, but FBR is fighting back with facts. In this resource, highly respected neuro-oncologist and FBR Board Vice-Chair Dr. Henry S. Friedman refutes myths surrounding animal research with scientific evidence and sets the record straight on the reality and benefits of animal research. Check it out. The brochure is also available in Spanish. Check out Investigación Animal Percepciones vs. Realidad.
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Dorothy Parker,
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The Foundation for Biomedical Research (FBR) is the nation’s oldest and largest non-profit dedicated to improving human and animal health by promoting public understanding and support for biomedical research. Our mission is to educate people about the essential role animal research plays in the quest for medical advancements, treatments and cures for both people and animals.
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