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December 5, 2012
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News for and about the civil engineering community

  Top Story 
 
Online, Accredited Civil Engineering Master's Program Features Two Areas of Study
Earn your Master of Engineering from a university that makes your achievements our purpose. Choose to focus in Water Resources or Geospatial Engineering with Colorado State University's industry-renowned program.
  Infrastructure Watch 
  • Ross: Hudson Yards is "needed for New York for the future"
      
    Source: CNBC
    The Hudson Yards project on Manhattan's Far West Side along the Hudson River broke ground on its first tower on Tuesday, according to Stephen Ross, chairman of The Related Cos. The project will create 15 million square feet of mixed-use buildings. "It's really the start of creating what I think is the new heart of New York," Ross says. The project is expected to create 23,000 construction jobs. CNBC (12/5) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story

  • Corroded connectors may be to blame for tunnel collapse in Japan
    Experts say connecting hardware corroded and weakened by decades of seeping groundwater, acidic exhaust gases and vibration may have given way in the Sasago Tunnel in Japan last weekend, causing more than 270 tons of concrete panels to collapse onto the roadway below. The disaster occurred only days after officials of Nippon Expressway Co. set up a committee to find the best ways to address deterioration caused by aging in tunnels and other structures. Yomiuri Shimbun (Japan) (12/4) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Will Sandy be another warning to be ignored?
    Government scientists, urban planners and academics worry that the fundamental lessons of Superstorm Sandy will be ignored. They met in New York to discuss ways to avoid that and to explore options that could mitigate future disasters. New York City, "as with any city, has faced numerous other crises and has overcome them through forward-thinking, largely transformative sets of policies, oftentimes on the back of a large infrastructure revision of what the city could be," said William Solecki, director of the City University of New York's Institute for Sustainable Cities. ScientificAmerican.com/ClimateWire (12/4) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
  Trends & Technology 
  • How AEC firms become and stay globally competitive
    There are two keys to help the architecture, engineering and construction industry become and remain globally competitive, according to Virginia Tech civil engineer John Taylor. They include using a Global Self-Assessment Tool, or G-SAT, and having an employee who acts as a "cultural boundary spanner," he says. "[A]s multicultural teams adapt, their performance rapidly improves and can even possibly outperform a homogenously cultural and lingual group," Taylor asserts. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • CIPP, a growing trend in pipe rehabilitation
    This piece explores the growing trend of using cured-in-place pipe in trenchless technology, which is also called a "no dig" repair solution because it requires minimal surface disruption and excavation. The article looks at several sites where CIPP was used for pipeline repairs. CompositesWorld.com (11/30) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Sustainable Development 
  • Tokyo takes sustainability to the next level
    Tokyo’s successful Green Building Program brought its expertise to the global arena when it joined C40 Cities, "a global climate leadership initiative in which cities around the world share best practices for sustainability." This piece discusses Tokyo's GBP in greater detail and notes the recognition that the Tokyo Metropolitan Government gave to 15 new buildings as models of sustainable construction. The Atlantic Cities (12/3) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Can China make its cities more livable?
    China's urban planners are starting to see the limitations of clusters of high-rises connected by highways, says designer Peter Calthorpe. The challenge now is to transition to a more livable and walkable vision of urban living, with densely packed buildings near mass-transit connections. "It's a daunting task, yet the impact will be monumental if we can move the needle even a little," Calthorpe says. CNNMoney/Fortune (12/3) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Advancing the Profession 
  • Smart bosses take their enemies to lunch
    Every business professional winds up making enemies, so the real test is how you respond to conflict, Mike Figliuolo writes. It's usually better to take the high road, responding to workplace slights by inviting your enemy for lunch or buying the person a beer. "You kill them with kindness. ... if you're being nothing but professional, it's hard for you to look bad," Figliuolo writes. ThoughtLeaders blog (12/3) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  News from ASCE 
  • Bridges 2013 calendar highlight: High Trestle Trail Bridge, Madrid, Iowa
      
    The builders of a 25-mile-long recreational trail along a former rail bed between Woodward and Ankeny, Iowa, in 2011 faced a significant structural challenge: the bridge across the Des Moines River had been dismantled years earlier, leaving nothing but a row of concrete piers. Instead of creating a merely functional crossing, the project team reimagined the 130-feet-high bridge as artwork reflecting the history and geography of the river valley. In a nod to the area’s coal-mining days, they punctuated the deck with steel frames that mimic the wooden cribs once used to shore up the walls of the mines. More interesting facts about the High Trestle Trail Bridge are in ASCE’s Bridges 2013 calendar. Order today. Don’t miss a great way to promote your business with a Bridges 2013 custom imprint calendar. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story

  • Civil Engineering online exclusive: Impact of East Coast Temblor Greater than Expected
    ASCE Civil Engineering magazine online  

    New research reveals that earthquake-induced ground shaking travels much farther on the East Coast than previously realized. See what the U.S. Geological Survey found, then discover more fascinating articles at www.asce.org/cemagazine.

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Learn more
about ASCE
ASCE Home  |  Join ASCE  |  Jobs
Training  |  Publications  |  Awards  |  Public Policy

Position TitleCompany NameLocation
Assistant/Associate ProfessorWayne State UniversityDetroit, MI
Tunnel Design EngineerJacobs AssociatesNew York, NY
Engineer or GeomorphologistInter-Fluve, Inc.Madison, WI
Civil EngineerMetropolitan Washington Airports AuthorityWashington, DC
Professor of Structural Engineering and Structural ConcreteSwiss Federal Institute of Technology ZurichZurich, Switzerland
Associate Geotechnical EngineerThe Geotechnical Department, LLCUS - NJ - Demarest
Click here to view more job listings.

  SmartQuote 
The forceps of our minds are clumsy things and crush the truth a little in the course of taking hold of it."
--H.G. Wells,
British author


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