District focuses on students with disabilities | Survey finds disconnect with gifted classes | Experts cite benefits of whole-child focus
April 17, 2019
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Curriculum & Instruction
District focuses on students with disabilities
District focuses on students with disabilities
(Pixabay)
Former teacher Laura McKenna explores 30 years of changes in New York's District 75, which exclusively serves students with severe disabilities. The district has shifted from a custodial focus to an academic one, and it has high standards for hiring instructors and paraprofessionals, McKenna writes.
Edutopia online (4/16) 
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Survey finds disconnect with gifted classes
Survey finds disconnect with gifted classes
(Pixabay)
Students in gifted classes are more likely to spend time on critical thinking, creativity and so-called "extension activities" than on advanced material, according to a survey by the National Center for Research on Gifted Education at the University of Connecticut. Three-quarters of the schools surveyed said they did not use a separate curriculum for gifted courses.
The Hechinger Report (4/15) 
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How to Support Transition Needs for ALL Students
Choose from the wide array of assessments in the BRIGANCE® Inventory of Early Development III and the Transition Skills Inventory to customize developmentally and age-appropriate transition plans for your severely cognitively delayed students. Get this free Transition Guide to learn more
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Educational Leadership
Experts cite benefits of whole-child focus
Experts cite benefits of whole-child focus
(Pixabay)
Schools that incorporate whole-child educational competencies have greater success in teaching social and emotional literacy, which better prepares students to navigate the workforce, experts said at the Reagan Institute Summit on Education. A major challenge for schools lies in measuring their own success in teaching those skills, panelists said.
Education Dive (4/16) 
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Technology Trends
How virtual reality can help students with autism
Computer scientists at Western Illinois University are creating a program that uses virtual reality to help students with autism prepare for social interactions during the school day. The program simulates social situations students are likely to encounter in middle school and prompts them to adjust their behavior if necessary.
KHQA-TV (Quincy, Ill.) (4/10) 
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Other News
Policy News
N.C. bill offers more financial literacy, less history
A bill under consideration by North Carolina lawmakers would reduce required US history classes in favor of adding a financial-literacy course. Supporters say the course is needed to educate students about subjects such as student debt, but critics say it should replace a required math course.
The News & Observer (Raleigh, N.C.) (tiered subscription model) (4/12) 
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Eye on Exceptionalities
Students use STEM skills to make toys accessible
Students use STEM skills to make toys accessible
(Pixabay)
Students in a robotics class at STEM Magnet Academy of Pointe Coupee in Louisiana are adapting electronic toys so they can be more easily used by children with disabilities such as cerebral palsy that affect motor skills. The toys are then distributed to students with special needs in the district's elementary schools.
The Advocate (Baton Rouge, La.) (4/16) 
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It's not the load that breaks you down. It's the way you carry it.
Lou Holtz,
former football player, coach and analyst

April is Stress Awareness Month

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