Amex CHRO: Help companies define their purpose | Leave your office and engage with employees, says talent exec | Column: The CHRO can help companies adapt as work changes
January 10, 2019
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Amex CHRO: Help companies define their purpose
Clarity is essential for chief HR officers, whether it's being aligned with the CEO on the meaning of "purpose" and "culture" or having the ability to persuade a skeptical board member, says Kevin Cox, CHRO of American Express. "I spend a lot of time trying to pull culture into leadership behaviors at the top of the organization," Cox says.
LinkedIn (1/9) 
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Leave your office and engage with employees, says talent exec
HR should aim to improve business skills and work alongside employees to understand their roles and needs, says Cristina Istria, talent and development director at Amcor Singapore. "We are part of the workforce, the 'us and them' mentality does not help us establish ourselves," Istria says.
Human Resources (Singapore) (1/7) 
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The most critical HR compliance challenges in 2019
XpertHR conducted its annual survey in the Fall of 2018, asking HR professionals for input and insight as to what they anticipate will be the most critical HR compliance challenges in 2019. Download XpertHR's Guide Now
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Aligning HR to the Business
Column: The CHRO can help companies adapt as work changes
Corporations are facing new ways of structuring and staffing themselves, and leading those conversations is an ideal role for the chief HR officer, writes Jim Link, CHRO for Randstad North America. "The mandate for CHROs is a tall order: navigating ongoing disruption, minimizing organizational risk and understanding internal and external drivers of change," he writes.
Forbes (1/8) 
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Developing Leaders and Organizations
Reinvent wellness by capitalizing on network effects
Use the concept of network effects to redesign wellness programs that focus on skills such as "a growth mindset for health, emotional well-being, balance and agility, restoration of mental energy and focus, nutrient-rich eating, and flexible capacity for high-demand periods," writes Joyce Young, managing director at Advanced Wellness Systems.
HR People + Strategy Blog (1/8) 
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How to get better feedback and do more with it
The way to ask for feedback is to seek out positive and negative reactions without debating the merits of what you hear, writes Jennifer Porter, managing partner of The Boda Group. "Making a plan and taking action are not only important for your learning and development, they're also a signal to those who shared the feedback -- you are serious about improving and you value their perspectives," Porter writes.
Harvard Business Review online (tiered subscription model) (1/8) 
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3 ways to move the needle on diversity
Leaders tend to see recruitment as the biggest factor in organizational diversity, but they may not recognize the biases that members of minority groups face daily, writes Miki Tsusaka of Boston Consulting Group. Implementing anti-discrimination policies, offering relevant training and establishing clear criteria for performance evaluations may help.
World Economic Forum (1/3) 
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Making the Most of Talent
How to support dyslexic employees
Accommodate dyslexic employees by arranging for a diagnosis and giving them easier-to-read materials, speech-recognition software, a quiet work area and ongoing training, writes Laura Little, a learning and development professional.
HRZone (UK) (1/9) 
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The future office does away with assigned desks
The next trend beyond open-plan offices are workplaces without assigned desks or personal areas, somewhat in the way a coffee shop is used by remote workers, writes Rae Nudson. "It's a design movement that will further reduce an employee's sense of privacy in the workplace -- and if you didn't like the open office, you're probably going to hate it," Nudson writes.
Medium (tiered subscription model) (1/7) 
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HR People + Strategy Update
HR People + Strategy 2019 Conference -- Courageous Leaders + Bold Culture
In an intimate environment among influential leaders, participants will benefit from close networking with peers and from the presentations and sessions that offer unsurpassed dialogue and discussion with speakers. Join HRPS at the JW Marriott Miami Turnberry Resort & Spa from April 7 to 10. Learn more.
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G.K. Chesterton,
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