Higher bone mineral density delays signs of facial aging in blacks | Teeth provide less support to the face with age | Financial mistakes: Inadequate insurance, reducing assets to avoid creditors
June 14, 2019
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Higher bone mineral density delays signs of facial aging in blacks
Studies have shown that black adults generally have higher bone mineral density than white adults, and new research published in JAMA Facial Plastic Surgery finds that, as a result, aging is less obvious in the faces of black people, compared with whites. "It is important for plastic surgeons to understand how the facial aging process differs among racial and ethnic groups to provide the best treatment," study author Boris Paskhover said.
HealthDay News (6/11) 
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Teeth provide less support to the face with age
Teeth gradually change shape with age, changing how the cheeks and lips are supported, says dentist Joseph Hung. Aligners, orthotics and restorations can improve the height and projection of the face, making it look more youthful, plastic and craniofacial surgeon Darren Smith says.
The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (6/11) 
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Practice Management
Financial mistakes: Inadequate insurance, reducing assets to avoid creditors
Inadequate insurance and reducing assets by transferring them to an LLC or trust to avoid creditors are two of the top financial mistakes made my physicians, writes attorney Ike Devji. Making this type of transfer with fraudulent intent "is both civilly and even criminally actionable by a plaintiff," he notes.
Modern Medicine/Physicians Practice (6/11) 
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Health Quality & Advocacy
Complex procedures, hypertension associated with postop bleeding risk
About 2% of inpatient plastic surgery patients experience postoperative bleeding complications requiring transfusion of at least one unit, with the highest risk associated with combination procedures, free flap breast reconstruction and pedicled transverse rectus abdominis musculocutaneous flap breast reconstruction, according to an analysis of data from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Patient risk factors include hypertension, a previously diagnosed bleeding disorder and longer total operative time.
Medscape (free registration)/Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery (6/10) 
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Expert: Ruling could affect hundreds of stem cell clinics
A ruling by US District Judge Ursula Ungaro in Florida said the FDA has the authority to regulate clinics that market unapproved procedures using stem cells derived from a patient's own fat. Researcher Leigh Turner of the University of Minnesota's Center for Bioethics said hundreds of clinics offer similar procedures and could be subject to FDA enforcement action.
The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (6/10) 
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Research & Technology
Salamander skin mucus could be used to seal wounds
Salamander skin mucus could be used to seal wounds
(Str/AFP/Getty Images)
A sticky mucus released by the skin of Chinese giant salamanders when they're injured is an excellent wound sealant, researchers say. The mucus' possible use as a medical adhesive is described in Advanced Functional Materials.
Gizmodo (6/10) 
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[We] thought that once we'd climbed the mountain, it was unlikely anyone would ever make another attempt.
Sir Edmund Hillary,
mountaineer who, with Sherpa Tenzing Norgay, was the first climber to reach Mount Everest's summit
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