Resource guides schools on special-ed, privacy laws | Teachers reimagine classroom routines during pandemic | Survey: Most teachers favor remote instruction
August 7, 2020
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Curriculum & Instruction
Resource guides schools on special-ed, privacy laws
(Pixabay)
Teletherapy via video chat and videoconferencing tools for students in special education are among the issues covered in a guide for schools released by the National Center for Learning Disabilities and the Future of Privacy Forum. The guide aims to untangle the implications related to many privacy laws during remote learning.
Full Story: Education Dive (8/5) 
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Teachers reimagine classroom routines during pandemic
(Chung Sung-Jun/Getty Images)
The coronavirus pandemic will upend many typical classroom routines. This article offers several strategies to help transition in-person routines to an online setting, such as eighth-grade teacher Alice Chen's plan to ask her students to create videos introducing themselves as an alternative to in-person introductions at the start of the school year.
Full Story: Education Week (tiered subscription model) (8/5) 
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Your Back-to-School 2020 Toolkit
Create a flexible plan for supporting students' academic and social-emotional behavior needs throughout the coming year—whether in a remote, onsite, or blended environment. Download your toolkit for specific action steps with aligned resources.
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Educational Leadership
Survey: Most teachers favor remote instruction
(Jure Makovec/AFP via Getty Images)
Two-thirds of teachers say they favor starting the school year teaching primarily online, according to an NPR/Ipsos poll. Among those surveyed, 82% of teachers say they are concerned about teaching in person this year, with 77% saying they are concerned about their health.
Full Story: National Public Radio (8/6) 
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Technology Trends
Research scientist Leah Zitter looks at the benefits of using virtual reality and augmented reality with students who have special needs, highlighting examples of the technology in classrooms and noting improvements to gear and design to assist students. VR and AR can boost motivation and enjoyment for students through gamefication and improve communication skills and social interactions, she writes.
Full Story: Tech & Learning (8/7) 
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Policy News
California is updating the formula it uses to calculate funding for special education, moving away from funding based on total number of students in a district. The new state budget also addresses transitions for students in special education, alternative pathways to diplomas and training and recruitment of teachers.
Full Story: EdSource (8/7) 
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Eye on Exceptionalities
Whole Children, a performing arts program in Massachusetts for teens and young people with special needs, is the subject of a documentary that gives a behind-the-scenes look at the organization that aims to boosts pride and self-esteem among the performers. Participants and their families credit the success of the program to director Matt Meers' flexibility and accommodations for everyone involved, even after the March musical was canceled because of the pandemic.
Full Story: Greenfield Recorder (Mass.) (8/6) 
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