pet pic | Chewy wins loyalty by showing care for pets, parents | Pet insurance may be a useful budgeting tool, veterinarian says
December 9, 2019
Pet Products SmartBrief
News for the Pet Industry
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(Peter Endig/DPA/Getty Images)
Chewy wins loyalty by showing care for pets, parents
E-commerce platform Chewy wins over pet parents with customer service reps and other staffers who show they care about customers' furry family members, CEO Sumit Singh says. This week, the company will also be focusing on investors as it makes its second earnings report since going public in June and presents at investor conferences.
Forbes (12/8) 
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Industry Watch
Pet insurance may be a useful budgeting tool, veterinarian says
The average cost of owning a pet in 2017 was estimated at $27,000 to $42,000 for a dog and $21,000 to $30,000 over the animal's lifetime, and pet insurance is a cost-management tool that's particularly useful in cases of injury or unexpected medical problems, writes veterinarian Teresa Hershey. The terms of pet insurance policies vary, and veterinarians can help clients choose a policy that's right for their pet.
Southwest Journal (Minneapolis) (12/2) 
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Smucker recalls certain lots of canned cat food
J.M. Smucker recalled specific lots of Special Kitty Mixed Grill Dinner Pate due to concerns that some ingredients can cause health problems. The product is sold alone and in variety packs, and the company urged consumers not to feed it to their cats and discard any leftovers.
WOIO-TV (Cleveland) (12/6) 
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Veterinarian: Essential oil diffusers aren't good gifts for pet owners
Essential oils in diffusers can sicken pets that inhale the vapors, consume spilled oil or lick oil that has been deposited on their fur, so diffusers are not good gifts for people with pets, says veterinarian Allison Fields. "If your pet does get into any essential oils you need to call your veterinarian, but ideally call the pet poison hotline," Dr. Fields said.
WTVF-TV (Nashville, Tenn.) (12/4) 
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Specialty care extends life of cat with heart disease
Veterinarian Kim Breeze and veterinary cardiologist Lauren Schlater prescribed a heart medication made for humans to a cat with atypical heart function, and the cat's owner says the drug extended the cat's life. "As more and more animals become like part of the family, I think more and more people are beginning to seek out specialty care for their dogs and cats," Dr. Schlater said.
News Herald (Panama City, Fla.) (12/8) 
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Top Trends and Product News
RestoraPet sells supplements to fight aging in pets
RestoraPet sells supplements to fight aging in pets
(Pixabay)
Pet supplement company RestoraPet sells a blend of flavored antioxidants that improves age-related quality of life for older dogs, cats and horses. Founder and CEO Brian Larsen knows the pain of losing a pet and leads his business with a mission to help pet owners, backed by financing from fellow dog lover Morton Meyerson.
The Washington Post (tiered subscription model) (12/5) 
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Report: Baby boomers' pet ownership grows
Baby boomers have been the only demographic group to increase the rate of pet ownership over the last decade, according to research by Packaged Facts. While millennials are still the biggest spenders on their pets, the ownership trend could give marketers a new target audience.
Pet Product News (12/9) 
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Pet owners pick names from pop culture
People are picking names for their new pets from pop culture sources including TV shows, royalty and musician and celebrity monikers, according to Rover's annual report. Fifty-five percent of pet parents say their furry family members have human names and 25% said they might give their pets names they had considered for their babies.
Pet Product News (12/6) 
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Kids may be more likely to read if a dog is within reach
Children are more likely to read and stay engaged with the material if a dog is present, researchers at the University of British Columbia, Okanagan, found. About 70% of the children in a study continued reading challenging material aloud when a dog was present, compared with 40% of the children in a cohort without a dog, researchers reported in Anthrozoos.
The Vancouver Sun (British Columbia) (11/28) 
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Pet Break
Soldier raises funds to bring his furry friend home
Soldier raises funds to bring his furry friend home
(Pixabay)
National Guardsman Dan Brissey met his feline friend Sully during his fourth tour in Afghanistan and he has raised more than $10,000 to bring the orange cat home to Seaford, Del., next month. Brissey is working with Nowzad, an animal rescue group in Afghanistan that has helped around 1,000 soldiers take pets home since 2007.
Dover Post (Del.) (12/5) 
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If a tree dies, plant another in its place.
Carl Linnaeus,
botanist, physician, zoologist, known as the father of modern taxonomy
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