House project provides real-life math lessons | Glow-in-the-dark room illuminates math skills | Program lets middle-schoolers explore outdoors
May 16, 2019
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Teaching & Learning
House project provides real-life math lessons
House project provides real-life math lessons
(Pixabay)
Students at a Colorado high school are getting hands-on experience in math by using their skills to build a house for Habitat for Humanity. "The whole thing is trying to improve math scores while simultaneously training kids for actual employable skills," said Scott Burke, Geometry in Construction co-creator.
KUSA-TV (Denver) (5/14) 
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Glow-in-the-dark room illuminates math skills
First-grade students in Brittany Jane Revel's Alabama classroom learn addition and subtraction through games such as tic-tac-toe and bowling in a room transformed to glow in the dark. "I wanted to find a way to help them master those skills while also having fun," Revel said.
The Brewton Standard (Ala.) (5/15) 
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Program lets middle-schoolers explore outdoors
Program lets middle-schoolers explore outdoors
(Pixabay)
The 21st annual Susquehanna Valley Middle School Envirothon, held at a nature reserve in Washingtonville, Pa., brought together students from 10 area middle schools to explore subjects including wildlife, forestry and soil. At one station, students learned about the process of creating maple syrup all the way from tapping trees to tasting the finished product.
The Standard-Journal (Milton, Pa.) (5/15) 
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Saxon Mathâ„¢ Paves a Path to Results
Do you know which modes of learning inspire confidence in your math students and which yield frustration and embarrassment? Saxon Mathâ„¢ empowers you to spotlight these preferences and offers a variety of learning opportunities to ensure learning is differentiated to match each student's unique needs. Learn more
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Curriculum
Do vouchers affect test scores, student emotions?
Do vouchers affect test scores, student emotions?
(Pixabay)
Students in Washington, D.C., who used vouchers to attend private schools showed no change in test scores after three years, according to a study by the US Department of Education. The data shows, however, that the students did have better rates of attendance and reported feeling more safe and satisfied than their peers who did not receive vouchers.
Chalkbeat (5/15),  Education Week (tiered subscription model) (5/15) 
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How does economic status affect performance?
How does economic status affect performance?
(Christopher Capozziello/Getty Images)
An analysis of federal data shows that students who are white, Asian or from a higher socioeconomic background are more likely to perform better academically, compared with black, Latino or students from low-income households, regardless of their academic abilities. The report from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce says, "[A] child from the bottom quartile of socioeconomic status who has high test scores in kindergarten has only a three in 10 chance of having a college education and a good entry-level job as a young adult."
Inside Higher Ed (5/15) 
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How to Advance as an Educator
Educators with advanced degrees and certifications have better access to in-demand careers, particularly in fields like science, math, special education and leadership. Learn how to advance as an educator and fill demands in the field.
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STEM
3 Reasons You Should Monitor App Security
Every year, new digital learning applications are introduced into today's classrooms. It's imperative that these apps meet the requirements of a school district's student data privacy policies. Download this guide to learn more.
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Policy & Legislation
Gates Foundation to study whether college pays off
The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation is launching a study aimed at determining whether a college education is worth the increasing price tag and potential to accrue student debt. The study will involve a 30-person commission that will evaluate student outcomes, particularly for students of color and those from low-income households.
U.S. News & World Report (5/16) 
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One of the things that attracted me to economics was its importance in improving people's lives.
Alice Rivlin,
economist

1931-2019

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Math Education SmartBrief is an aggregation of published news and editorial content from diverse sources. The content of Math Education SmartBrief does not necessarily reflect the position or editorial viewpoint of any particular organization.
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