Study: Summer program boosts ELLs' skills | Reflecting on "Sesame Street" as program hits milestone | Tips for supporting administrator PD
November 12, 2019
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Teaching and Learning
Study: Summer program boosts ELLs' skills
Study: Summer program boosts ELLs' skills
(Unsplash)
Listening, speaking and writing skills improved among English-language learners in California who participated in a summer-school program, according to a study by Angela Johnson of NWEA, a nonprofit assessment organization. The study found that participating in the program for more than one year could help boost long-term graduation rates among the students.
Education Dive (11/11) 
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Other News
U.S. Supreme Court Cases Educators Should Know
Elevating Equity and Justice takes a deep dive into ten U.S. Supreme Court cases that cover the landscape of both civil rights and civil liberties, exploring topics and situations teachers and administrators face every day. Learn more.
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Transformational Leadership
Tips for supporting administrator PD
Facilitating professional-development opportunities for administrators can be a challenge, writes Kimberly Tew, assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction in a New Jersey district. In this blog post, she shares strategies her district has adopted to address this need, including establishing a weekly book club, plus scheduling instructional rounds for peer observation and feedback.
Edutopia (11/8) 
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Other News
How Can We Help Students with Dyslexia?
Across the country, public schools are failing to identify students with dyslexia and, therefore, unable to provide the intervention and treatment they need. In this podcast, Emily Hanford will discuss the importance of reading approaches backed by scientific evidence. Listen to Podcast
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Technology in the Classroom
Instagram adds US to test of dropping "likes" count
Instagram adds US to test of dropping "likes" count
(Pixabay)
Instagram "likes" will become private for a portion of the platform's US users this week as part of a test it has been running in seven countries, according to Adam Mosseri, CEO, who noted, "It's about young people -- the idea is to try and depressurize Instagram, make it less of a competition." While marketers will still have access to "like" metrics, a recent HypeAuditor study found a drop in like counts in those countries where the policy is in effect.
Social Media Today (11/9),  TechCrunch (11/8),  BNN Bloomberg (Canada) (11/8) 
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The Whole Child
Are active shooter drills harmful to students?
Are active shooter drills harmful to students?
(Unsplash)
Active shooter drills at schools could harm the psychological development of young students, asserts Melissa Reeves, a professor at Winthrop University and former president of the National Association of School Psychologists. In this interview, she describes how the drills can potentially trigger students who have experienced trauma and suggests schools practice lockdown procedures instead.
National Public Radio (11/10) 
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Pa. school district may expand grab-and-go meals
Pa. school district may expand grab-and-go meals
(Pixabay)
Pennsylvania's Keystone Central School District is considering dedicating areas at Central Mountain High School and Central Mountain Middle School for "grab and go" food due to increasing demand. Food service director Sharon Berger says the goal for the high school would be to expand the school store area to increase the number of grab-and-go breakfasts served and to offer second-chance breakfasts and grab-and-go lunches for the 2020-2021 school year.
The Express (Lock Haven, Pa.) (11/11) 
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Policy Watch
Feds cancel $11M in loan debt for some students
Feds cancel $11M in loan debt for some students
(Pixabay)
The US Education Department has cancelled about $11 million in federal student loans for more than 1,500 students who attended two for-profit colleges owned by Dream Center Education Holdings, which shut down last year. Rep. Bobby Scott, D-Va., chairman of the House education committee, says the move doesn't go far enough to relieve the debt of students who attended such institutions.
The Associated Press (11/8),  The Washington Post (tiered subscription model) (11/8) 
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Calif. delays college math admissions proposal
The California State University system has revised a proposal to require incoming college students to have four years of math courses, delaying planned implementation until 2027. Trustees say the one-year extension will give schools time to adapt, and the proposal will include exemptions for students attending schools that cannot offer the extra classes.
EdSource (11/8) 
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Broaden your idea of what it means to compose.
In her new book, Writing, Redefined, Shawna Coppola challenges us to think outside the traditions of writing to go beyond pen and paper. By allowing ourselves and our students to redefine writing, we redefine what it means to be a writer.
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Faculty Lounge
Colleges find ways to support first-gen students
Colleges and universities are creating programs to help first-generation students connect with each other and faculty members, and some are proving effective in keeping such students on a path to graduation. Sarah Whitley, the director of the Center for First-generation Student Success, says such students are diverse, and many need help in identifying support systems at colleges and universities.
National Public Radio (11/8) 
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New from ASCD
What Schools Can Do for Immigrant Students
By U.S. law, all children have the right to a public education, but immigrant students and their families, especially those who are undocumented, often face a climate of unknowns. By gaining clarity on their rights, as well as addressing blind spots within school policies, educators can provide more comprehensive support.
Your Students, My Students, Our Students: Rethinking Equitable and Inclusive Classrooms
"Your Students, My Students, Our Students" explores the hard truths of current special education practice with this ASCD member book from Lee Ann Jung, Nancy Frey, Douglas Fisher, and Julie Kroener. Written not for "special educators" or "general educators" but for all educators, this book outlines five essential disruptions to the status quo, addresses the challenges, maps out the solutions, and provides tools and inspiration for the work ahead.
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