Screening protocol ensures service members get TBI care | DOD, VA adopt sleep disorder treatment guidelines | CO might have poisoned thousands on military bases
February 26, 2020
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Most of the 110 service members diagnosed with mild traumatic brain injury or concussion-like symptoms sustained in the Al Asad Air Base attack have returned to active duty, but 25 were transported to the US for more treatment, according to a DOD news release. The blast triggered mandatory TBI screening under the Military Acute Concussion Evaluation 2 protocol, and "and every single person that we've identified is getting the treatment that they need," said Air Force Brig. Gen. Paul Friedrichs, Joint Staff Surgeon.
Full Story: Military online (2/25) 
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Military Health System
The DOD and VA have adopted new guidelines for treating chronic insomnia and obstructive sleep apnea in what team leader Vincent Mysliwiec says is "a major step ... in recognizing the importance of appropriately diagnosing and treating sleep disorders in these unique populations." Mysliwiec, a retired Army colonel, led the multidisciplinary team that developed the guidelines and is lead author of a synopsis published in Annals of Internal Medicine.
Full Story: San Antonio Express-News (tiered subscription model) (2/24) 
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Veterans Health Administration
The West Palm Beach VA Medical Center recently opened the General Domiciliary Residential Program, where eligible veterans can receive treatment for substance use disorders, post-traumatic stress disorder and similar conditions. The facility is the first targeted mental health facility of its kind in South Florida where veterans can receive both treatment and peer support.
Full Story: WPTV-TV (West Palm Beach, Fla.) (2/20) 
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National Health Care
Six patients with COVID-19 are in quarantine at Lackland Air Force Base in Texas, one is quarantined at Naval Base Ventura County, Calif., and 198 patients are being housed at March Air Reserve Base in California. Other bases designated as possible COVID-19 quarantine sites are the 168th Regiment, Regional Training Institute in Fort Carson, Colo.; Travis Air Force Base, Calif.; and Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, Calif.
Full Story: AL (Alabama) (2/25),  Los Angeles Times (tiered subscription model) (2/25) 
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Health and Medical Research
Researchers from the University of Utah Health and the VA Salt Lake City Health Care system developed an artificial intelligence-based wearable sensor that can remotely detect changes in patients with heart failure. The adhesive sensor patch, which uses patients' electrocardiogram and movement data, had a sensitivity between 76% and 88% and a specificity of 85% in predicting hospitalization risk, and the prediction occurred 10.4 days before patients were readmitted to the hospital.
Full Story: Verdict Medical Devices (UK) (2/25) 
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Reps. Elaine Luria, D-Va., and Adam Kinzinger, R-Ill., have introduced a bill calling for a study on whether military pilots have a higher cancer risk. The Military Pilot Cancer Incidence Study Act would also look into cockpit radiation and other toxic exposure that may explain the spike in cancer rates among military pilots, and make certain cancer screenings mandatory.
Full Story: McClatchy Washington Bureau (2/20) 
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AMSUS News
The full-day AMSUS Regional Seminar on March 3 has sold out. There is no onsite registration/walk-in available. Featured speakers from the MRDC Combat Casualty Care Research team, other prolonged field care leaders, JHU Applied Physics Lab, and other experts in PFC science and technology will address gaps in knowledge by highlighting current and future science & technology needs relevant to PFC, and discuss current best PFC practices and areas of innovation. Due to overwhelming response, AMSUS is in discussions to offer this seminar again, details TBA. Learn more about this regional seminar and its supporters.
On April 30 and May 1, the "UNC/AMSUS May Day Trauma Conference" will be held at The William and Ida Friday Center in Chapel Hill, N.C. May Day is a two-day conference designed to meet the educational needs of the healthcare team--civilian and military--across the continuum of trauma care, and also features vendor exhibition and poster presentations. Attendee and vendor registration will be available soon. Register today!
Interested in attending, exhibiting or presenting? Contact Susan.Bachenheimer@amsus.org or Lori.Lawrence@amsus.org.
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I don't have a feeling of inferiority. Never had. I'm as good as anybody, but no better.
Katherine Johnson,
mathematician, NASA scientist, Presidential Medal of Freedom recipient
1918-2020
February is Black History Month
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