Report: Increasing supply won't fix housing affordability crisis | Dams, reservoirs now impede most of Earth's longest rivers | Volcanic eruptions can have far-reaching effects
May 16, 2019
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Geography in Action
Report: Increasing supply won't fix housing affordability crisis
Building more housing or changing zoning laws may not be effective ways to address the lack of affordable housing in major cities, according to an analysis by economic geographers Andres Rodriguez-Pose and Michael Storper. The affordability crisis is tied to "underlying wage and income inequalities, and a sharp increase in the value of central locations within metro areas, as employment and amenities concentrate in these places," they note.
CityLab (5/9) 
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Dams, reservoirs now impede most of Earth's longest rivers
Reservoirs and dams hinder 63% of Earth's 246 longest rivers, a study published in Nature suggests. Such disruptions in flow can impede freshwater biodiversity and prevent sediment from protecting coastal regions that face the threat of rising sea levels.
Science News (5/10) 
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“A creative roadmap to the migration field”
Authoritative, yet accessible, "Age of Migration" explores international migration and its effects on both origin and destination societies. Students and professionals alike will appreciate its wide range of case studies, useful maps, and jargon-free approach. More information!
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Research, Education and Global Change
Weather tied to ancient population decline
Weather tied to ancient population decline
(Pixabay)
Erratic climate patterns 8,600 years ago contributed to the decline of hunter-gatherer populations in South America, according to findings published online in Scientific Reports. Those populations rebounded about 6,000 years ago when rainfall became more predictable, researchers say.
Science News (5/9) 
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Carbon dioxide levels hit highest level in human history
The atmosphere's carbon dioxide concentration has surpassed 415 parts per million, the highest it's been since before modern human existence, scientists say. The high levels -- primarily attributed to the burning of fossil fuels, deforestation and other human activity -- are contributing to increasing global temperatures.
CNN (5/13) 
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Technology and Applications
Researchers using AI to address extreme weather
Machine learning is a key element in researchers' use of artificial intelligence to better understand the impacts of severe weather. The technology is helping create models designed to mitigate wildfire damage and to provide specific flood-risk predictions as much as five days in advance, among other developments.
The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (5/12) 
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Team creates underwater objects to preserve beaches
After studying the formation of sandbars in the Maldives, MIT and Maldivian researchers have developed partly biodegradable bladders that, when submerged, can contribute to the growth of beaches and sandbars. The project is seen as a promising way to address coastal erosion and sea level rise.
Dezeen (5/13) 
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Association News
Sign Up for the 2019 Geography Faculty Development Alliance Workshops
The 2019 Early Career Workshop, scheduled for June 23-29, is geared toward helping participants balance responsibilities of academic life and understand how their teaching, research, service and personal lives intersect. Additionally, the goal of the Department Leadership Workshop, set for June 26-29, is to help participants respond effectively to the challenges and opportunities departments face and achieve success. These concurrent annual workshops will be held at George Washington University in Washington, D.C. Learn more.
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There's Still Time to Upload Your #aagDC Poster
If you presented a poster at the 2019 AAG Annual Meeting in Washington, D.C., you can still upload it to the 2019 abstract gallery. Adding your poster to the gallery gives your poster a longer lifespan, expanding the impact and visibility of your research. In addition, uploading your poster has perks, such as providing you with a shareable link for your resume, CV or Linkedin profile. Learn more.
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One of the things that attracted me to economics was its importance in improving people's lives.
Alice Rivlin,
economist

1931-2019

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