Why a bad decision is better than no decision at all | Sandy takes social networks by storm | Don't wait for leaders to emerge -- develop them
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November 1, 2012
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What's Happening
Why a bad decision is better than no decision at all
Bosses need to give employees permission to make bad decisions from time to time, writes Mike Figliuolo, who polled business leaders and found that 96% of them would rather see team members make mistakes than to leave all important decisions up to their bosses. According to Figliuolo, a thoughtful approach to decision making should permit the occasional goof in the name of avoiding paralysis while using mistakes as learning moments. ThoughtLeaders blog (10/22)
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Sandy takes social networks by storm
Social media users shared comments, rumors, updates and images as Hurricane Sandy and its remnants lashed the East Coast, with the hashtag #Sandy racking up 4 million Twitter mentions with a potential reach of 3 billion people, according to a Radian6 analysis. Instagram said tens of thousands of storm-related images were uploaded to its network. USA Today (10/30)
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Don't wait for leaders to emerge -- develop them
Good bosses ensure their company has a steady stream of up-and-coming leaders, writes Joel Garfinkle. Try offering mentoring to workers who get glowing reports from their bosses and peers, Garfinkle advises. "These are the rising stars who care enough to do their very best work. Many of them are aspiring leaders who will jump at the chance to be mentored by you," he writes. SmartBrief/SmartBlog on Leadership (10/15)
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Other News
Leadership Focus
3 principles that are the bedrock of good management
There will be improvements in performance when companies follow three basic principles of management, write Nicholas Bloom, Raffaella Sadun, and John Van Reenen. Companies should have short- and long-term goals, reward high performers and regularly monitor all aspects of the organization. These principles can also be applied to manufacturing, health care and education, they write. Harvard Business Review (11/2012)
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Do you lead or do you just pretend?
Leaders can be thought of as the actors of business -- the bad ones are transparently inauthentic, while the best inspire and enrapture, Alan Derek Utley writes. Along with authenticity is the need to receive honest feedback. "For most of us, our reviews aren't likely published for public view. But the best leaders seek out reviews, and don't stop at the ones that are glowing. They find the truth tellers who genuinely want them to be better," Utley writes. LeadChangeGroup.com (10/25)
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7 changes companies must go through as they grow
The goal of startups is to grow, often into a big company of $250 million annual revenue or more, but doing so brings numerous shifts in culture, strategy and organization, writes Daniel McCarthy. This includes a shift from the technical to the personal. "Leaders need to start spending less time on the technical aspects of the business and much more time on coaching and developing employees," he writes. SmartBrief/SmartBlog on Leadership (10/25)
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SmartBrief publishes industry-specific e-mail newsletters in partnership with prominent associations, professional societies, corporations and nonprofits. More than 5.5 million executives and professionals rely on SmartBrief every day to stay informed and save them time. Visit here to view our partners, see samples and subscribe. For updates, follow us on Twitter or become a fan on Facebook. Want to explore partnering? Let's talk.
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Media 2.0
8 keys to making a splash with microblogging
It's an art to effectively use short status messages on social networks, writes Chris Martin. Restraint and careful targeting are the keys to building up an audience, Martin writes. "If you continue to microblog about superficial topics, people will tune you out," he warns. SmartBrief/SmartBlog on Social Media (10/29)
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LinkedIn's profile pages add editing features
LinkedIn has made a significant change in its profile pages, including a biography section, greater picture prominence and finer categorization of skills. It has also "rebuilt profile editing" in an attempt to spur content creation, according to product manager Aaron Bronzan. The network says it's adding 175,000 profiles a day and could reach 5 billion searches this year. Adweek (10/16)
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Moms are going mobile, and marketers are rushing to keep up
Moms are spearheading the transition from desktop social networking to mobile social networking, according to an eMarketer report, with more than 6 out of 10 using smartphones and one-fifth using tablets. That's driving a marked increase in moms' total social-network use but presents some challenges for marketers, who must take a holistic approach to social advertising. "Businesses that take this approach not only stand a better chance of reaching moms now, but they can prepare themselves for the inevitable usage shift that other demographic groups will make," the report says. eMarketer (10/16)
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SmartNugget
Run your business like a 1980s MTV star
The big-hair, big-noise bands of the 1980s aren't known for their business acumen, but any company can learn from them, Kristin Woodman writes. The best bands knew how to differentiate themselves, how to have fun while getting work done and how to evolve as the public's tastes changed. "Like an evolving band, a company's success is dependent on a commitment to core principles, with awareness that compromise is possible -- and potentially necessary -- to thrive in a changing marketplace," Woodman writes. ThoughtLeaders blog (10/17)
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About SmartBrief
SmartBrief publishes industry-specific e-mail newsletters in partnership with more than 180 leading associations, professional societies, corporations and nonprofits. More than 5.5 million executives and professionals rely on SmartBrief every day to stay informed and save them time.
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