Stem cell study hints at fertility option for men after chemo | Older breast cancer survivors are more prone to additional cancer | Study data lead to drop in prostate cancer screenings, report says
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November 8, 2012
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Patient-Centered Cancer Care
Stem cell study hints at fertility option for men after chemo
Researchers, working with young and adult male monkeys, froze sperm-producing stem cells, gave the monkeys chemotherapy drugs and later implanted the monkey's own sperm-producing stem cells into his testes. The study in Cell Stem Cell found the implanted stem cells restored sperm production and led to successful egg fertilization and embryo creation. U.S. News & World Report/HealthDay News (11/2)
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Older breast cancer survivors are more prone to additional cancer
Researchers looked at data on 110,440 breast cancer survivors in the U.S. and found that older women were more likely to develop additional primary cancers in the long term than those 64 and younger. Female breast cancer survivors ages 70 to 79 faced the greatest risk of multiple primary malignancy. The findings were presented at an International Society of Geriatric Oncology meeting. Family Practice News (11/5)
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Emerging Trends, Products & Technologies
Computational genomics drives personalized cancer care
Software engineers are emerging as key players in the drive to translate massive amounts of genomic data into drugs that target specific genetic mutations. Using about the same amount of computing power as is available on the average personal computer, computational biologists are developing algorithms to identify recurring genetic patterns in tumors. Drugmakers will increasingly work with software developers, such as Microsoft, to develop new algorithms, methodologies and even therapies, says Les Jordan, chief technology strategist at Microsoft's Life Sciences unit. Reuters (11/1)
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Survey shows how patients use Web for health care
A Manhattan Research survey revealed 54% of respondents turn to the Internet to determine the services they may need and the right health care personnel to provide them. Data also showed 79% of patients diagnosed with chronic disease in the past three months went online for their health care decisions, compared with 53% of patients diagnosed a year earlier. However, only 20% of Internet-savvy patients use the Web to choose a primary care physician, researchers said. American Medical News (free content) (11/5)
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Cancer Research & Health Policy
Health reform needed to ensure proper care for minorities
An overhaul of the U.S. health care system is needed to ensure access to care, particularly for minorities, and to avoid preventable deaths and disabilities among the uninsured minority population, according to an opinion piece by Dr. Debra Houry and Dr. Sheryl Heron of Emory University Hospital. They write that the disparity is particularly on display with breast cancer, as black women are more likely to be diagnosed with larger and more aggressive tumors and uninsured women are four times more likely than those with private insurance to have metastasized cancer. CNN (11/3)
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Oncology group updates breast cancer care guidelines
The American Society of Clinical Oncology released new guidelines for follow-up care for breast cancer survivors. The group urges providers to give cancer survivors a physical exam and history every three to six months during the first three years after primary therapy. The guidelines, which appeared online in the Journal of Clinical Oncology, urge providers not to conduct routine blood tests, biomarker studies or imaging tests besides mammograms when patients have no symptoms. InternalMedicineNews.com (free registration) (11/5)
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Foundation News
Moonshots
Inspired by President John F. Kennedy’s 1962 address at Rice University, the MD Anderson Cancer Center developed a new program called Moonshots. Its goal is to locate at-risk populations for eight forms of cancer and to have a positive impact on those patients’ outcomes, survival rates, quality of life, and to learn about the results of the new treatment methods and research. Just like the space program’s breakthroughs, national unity and collaboration between researchers across the country will be critical to the success of this program and the overall goal of making advancements in the fight against cancer. Read more on the LIVESTRONG blog.
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Moving Forward
Pain associated with cancer can last beyond treatment. To help survivors cope with this challenge and others, the LIVESTRONG Foundation and the American Society of Clinical Oncology teamed up to create Moving Forward, a series of videos that offer help and advice for living with the aftereffects of cancer treatment. To learn more, visit the LIVESTRONG blog.
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LIVESTRONG SmartQuote
I think it is very important for all of us to be aware of ways to go forward with making ourselves feel comfortable with our bodies again."
-- Ann F., cancer survivor
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The LIVESTRONG Foundation does not necessarily endorse the opinions that may be mentioned on this site, the articles are published for informational purposes and are not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of your physician or other qualified health provider with any questions you may have regarding a medical condition. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it because of something you have read on this site.
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The LIVESTRONG Foundation provides free cancer support services to help people cope with the financial, emotional and practical challenges that accompany the disease. Created in 1997 by cancer survivor and philanthropist Lance Armstrong, the Foundation is known for its powerful brand – LIVESTRONG–and for its advocacy on behalf of survivors and their families. With its iconic yellow LIVESTRONG wristband, the Foundation has become a symbol of hope and inspiration around the world. Since its inception, the Foundation has raised nearly $500 million to support cancer survivors and served 2.5 million people affected by the disease. For more information, visit LIVESTRONG.org.
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