Why well-being must be a priority for women in business | Former HP CEO shares advice for young businesswomen | Don't be your own worst enemy, say female execs
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March 27, 2013
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Number of women taking GMAT reaches all-time high
Women took 122,843 GMAT exams during the 2012 testing year -- a record. Overall, women test takers accounted for 43% of the exams administered during the year. In China, women took 37,710 tests, nearly double the number they took in 2010. "The increase among Chinese women is miraculous," said Elissa Ellis-Sangster, the Forté Foundation's executive director. "I think it's a great story of the global economy, and I do think developing countries will start to take a closer look at women and their impact on the workforce." Bloomberg Businessweek/Getting In blog (3/5)
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Leadership at Work
Why well-being must be a priority for women in business
The women's empowerment movement has entered a new phase that focuses on reshaping the business world and on well-being, according to media executive Arianna Huffington. "[T]his time we're not just fighting for a space in the world, we're fighting to change it," she said. Everyone -- including men -- can benefit from this revamped work culture, according to Huffington. Forbes (3/21)
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Former HP CEO shares advice for young businesswomen
The number of women CEOs has increased since Carly Fiorina took over as the leader of Hewlett-Packard in 1999, but challenges remain. "Women are subjected to a higher level of scrutiny and criticism than men, in every field," said Fiorina, whose tenure with the company ended in 2005. Women in the business world are likely to encounter a few colleagues with frustrating attitudes, but it's important not to get discouraged. "Don't make it your problem," she advises. Bloomberg Businessweek (3/23)
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Don't be your own worst enemy, say female execs
Many female leaders admit to being plagued by self-doubt and fear of failure. The key, say executives such as Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg and McKinsey Senior Director Joanna Barsh, is to push ahead regardless. Women who second-guess themselves too much will find men climbing ahead of them on the corporate ladder, Barsh warns. "It turns out that the challenge of getting out of my own way was the biggest one I ever faced," Barsh says. CNNMoney/Fortune (3/5)
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Women senators are becoming more prevalent, powerful
Men still dominate the U.S. Senate, but there are now 20 women in the legislative body -- a record high. In addition to bringing different viewpoints to the table, research suggests that women lawmakers may also be more likely to reach across party lines. "[W]hile men may choose to obstruct and delay, women continue to strive to build coalitions and bring about new policies," according to a recent study. The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (3/21)
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Forté Foundation News
2013 Forté MBA Women's Leadership Conference
Exclusively for MBA Women at Forté sponsor schools, this must-attend event taking place June 28 to 29 in New York City will help define the shape of things to come as women cross the tipping point in influence, power and leadership. Register now.
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2013 Forté Financial Services FAST Track Conference
Interested in a career in financial services? Get on the fast track and gain valuable insight into this exciting industry. The Financial Services FAST Track Conference June 3 to 4 in New York City provides an opportunity to explore the exciting world of Finance and the diverse career opportunities available in this industry. Apply now.
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From College to Career
Jump in over your head a little, says ad exec
Women often want to feel 100% ready before taking on new challenges, but they should embrace their fears and move ahead, says Lori Senecal, chairman and CEO of Kirshenbaum Bond Senecal + Partners. "It's OK to jump in a little over your head. That's how you learn," she said. Senecal also urges women to ask for what they are worth and to create leadership opportunities for themselves within a company. Forbes (3/14)
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Blunders that can hurt your job search
Certain missteps can make your job hunt harder than it has to be, writes Haley Heieck, a recruiter for Hajoca Corp. Heieck lists 10 such mistakes, which include failing to proofread your application and failing to let your personality shine through. "Often skills can be taught, but the person that shows they will fit into the company culture best is going to be given preference," she writes. The Work Buzz (3/8)
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MBA Outlook
Pitfalls that will lower your chances of getting admitted
Your odds of getting into business school will be worse if you only apply to top-tier schools, don't have clear objectives or lack work experience, writes Rose Martinelli, a former admissions director at the Booth School of Business at the University of Chicago. If you aren't admitted, remember that rejection is a temporary setback. "A 'deny' decision is not a failure, just an opportunity for you to gain greater perspective and refocus your efforts," she writes. Bloomberg Businessweek/Getting In blog (3/20)
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How are MBA programs changing with the times?
In response to a rapidly evolving workforce, business schools are scrambling to find ways to help their MBA graduates craft distinct paths toward their intended careers. The University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School allows students to choose from six "pathways" within their business program, while the Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management has infused traditional business-school concepts with overarching themes such as innovation and entrepreneurship. U.S. News & World Report (3/12)
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Tips for a productive campus visit
Before selecting a business school, it's a good idea to go on a campus visit and chat with current students to learn about their experiences, writes Stacy Blackman. "[D]on't just talk to a couple of people -- this is too big a decision to make without first experiencing a variety of conversations and points of view while on campus," she writes. You should also observe how teachers interact with students and learn about the local social scene. U.S. News & World Report/MBA Admissions: Strictly Business blog (3/15)
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Women of the World
Women business leaders are making progress globally
Women hold almost one-quarter of senior leadership positions worldwide, according to a Forbes Insights study with Grant Thornton, but some regions have made more headway than others. In the Asia-Pacific region, 29% of senior leadership positions are held by women; only 21% of North America's senior leaders are women. Flexible working arrangements and talent-management programs are two ways to get more women into leadership positions, writes Tatiana Serafin. Forbes (3/8)
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Women process work stress differently than men do, research finds
One-third of workers report chronic stress related to their jobs, and women feel more stress than men do, finds an American Psychological Association study. Women have a "tend and befriend" response to stress that causes them to seek comfort from loved ones, while men have "fight or flight" reactions, experts say. The Wall Street Journal (tiered subscription model) (3/4)
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SmartQuote
Accept that people will talk about you. Don't dwell on it. Just keep going."
-- Carly Fiorina, former CEO of Hewlett-Packard, as quoted by Bloomberg Businessweek
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About Forté Foundation
Forté Foundation is a consortium of leading multinational corporations, top business schools in the U.S. and abroad, and the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC). Forté has become a powerful change agent directing women towards leadership roles in business and enabling corporations to more effectively reach and retain top female talent. It is the only organization that provides a national infrastructure for women at all stages of the career continuum to access the information, scholarship support and networking connections they need to succeed in business careers. Learn more at www.fortefoundation.org.
 
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