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April 13, 2010
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The Game Changer 
  • Why isn't Microsoft bringing innovation to market?
    Microsoft spends money on projects for innovation and research and development, yet little of that work is turned into consumer products, Adam Hartung writes. "Microsoft has been horrible at effectively moving truly new products from development to the marketplace," Hartung writes. One problem, he writes, is its failure to use "white space teams," which Hartung defines as unconstrained, dedicated employees tasked with turning innovative ideas into commercially viable products. Forbes (4/12) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Today's Bytes 
  • Palm reportedly seeks a buyer
    Palm has enlisted Goldman Sachs and Qatalyst Partners to help the company find a buyer; possible purchasers reportedly include HTC and Lenovo Group. Bloomberg (4/12) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Managing IT 
  • The answers that IT leaders will need to move forward
    Business executives and their IT counterparts can expect some difficult conversations as long-delayed IT spending resumes, argues Rudy Puryear, Bain's head of global IT. Puryear presents five questions tech leaders must be ready to answer as part of those conversations. "I believe there is a broken dialogue that exists between business and IT," Puryear says. CIO.com (4/9) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Keep your job search quiet
    Anyone who has left a résumé in the office copy machine can testify to the importance of keeping a job search private. Avoid obvious interview attire at work, don't use office equipment to contact recruiters and never resort to guilty whispers when fielding phone calls, Calvin Sun writes. TechRepublic/10 Things blog (4/12) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Geeking Out 
  • When "security" measures are just a waste of time
    A Microsoft researcher who examined password-security practices found many of them to be a poor use of time. Routinely changing passwords is a time-intensive chore, and the practice is unlikely to prevent a cyber-attack, the study found. "Most security advice simply offers a poor cost-benefit trade-off to users," Microsoft's Cormac Herley wrote in a report. The Boston Globe (free registration) (4/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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SmartQuote 
Unnecessary IT complexity is, in fact, a critical business issue because companies continually add much more to the IT base than they ever take away."
--Rudy Puryear, partner at Bain, as quoted by CIO.com
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