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19 March 2013  
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Education News from Around the World

  Learning and Teaching 
 
  • Students in Canada read historical bio for Twitter Book Club
    High-school students in schools across Canada are spending spring break reading "Survival Kit," written by Holocaust survivor Zuzana Sermer, and tweeting their observations and reactions to the historical book. The Twitter Book Club project involves students reading and reacting to the tweets of their peers. Scott Masters, head of social studies at North York's Crestwood Preparatory College in Ontario, said he described the Twitter Book Club to his students as doing a book report one tweet at a time. "I think it's an idea with great potential and the wave of the future. This (social media) is where these kids live so re-purpose it," Masters said. InsideToronto.com/North York Mirror (14 Mar.) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
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  Professional Leadership 
  • Ontario's schools are challenged by lack of PE teachers
    About 45% of elementary schools in Ontario, Canada, have a teacher on staff trained in health and physical education, according to a survey released Monday. The results of the survey of elementary and high-school principals show that a majority of PE staff are part-time workers and educators are struggling to meet a provincial mandate that students in grades 1-8 spend 20 minutes daily engaged in physical activity. The Globe and Mail (Toronto) (tiered subscription model) (18 Mar.) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
  Regional Spotlight 
ASCD Worldwide Edition SmartBrief highlights education practices and policies in specific regions to give readers more in-depth insight into that country or region's education system. This edition focuses on the United Arab Emirates.

  • UAE focused on improving education
    In this interview, Sheik Nahayan bin Mubarak al-Nahayan, who recently stepped down as the United Arab Emirates' education minister, says the country was able to recruit more top teachers by switching the language of education from Arabic to English. He also explains the decision to purchase 14,000 iPads for universities and the focus on helping young people secure jobs after graduation. The New York Times (tiered subscription model) (17 Mar.) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 
  • Can visual lessons help students with learning difficulties?
    Students with learning difficulties, such as dyslexia, benefit more from visual lessons -- not traditional note-taking -- Tony Buzan, creator of a mind-mapping memorisation technique, told teachers in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, during a recent presentation. "Using words with one colour is antithetical to the way the brain learns," he said. "The brain learns with images, associations and multi-senses. Normal note-taking compounds learning difficulties." The National (Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates) (17 Mar.) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Reform and Research 
  • Should schools focus on differences between boys and girls?
    A recent study of 75 countries, using a decade of data from the Programme for International Student Assessment, offers additional insight into the maths and reading gaps that exist among female and male students -- with girls continuing to outperform boys in reading and male students excelling in maths. "Educational systems could be improved by acknowledging that, in general, boys and girls are different," said David Geary, who co-authored the study with Gijabert Stoet from the University of Leeds in England. "The consistent pattern within nations suggests the sex differences are not simply related to socioeconomic factors." Education Week/Curriculum Matters blog (15 Mar.) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 
  • S. Korea takes heavier hand against student bullying
    In South Korea, officials are stepping up efforts to address bullying and violence in schools following two recent suicides of students. Initial steps include the installation of closed-circuit cameras at schools, a focus on eliminating school gangs, the inclusion of anti-bullying lessons in school and additional security offices in schools. Time.com (17 Mar.) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Chinese universities reverse course on English requirements
    High-school students in China no longer are required to pass English assessments for admission to some of the country's top universities. The change, officials say, will help students focus more on their course of study. For example, students interested in studying science and engineering would need to take and pass physics and maths exams. Forbes (17 Mar.) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  ASCD News 
  • ASCD launches interactive 2012 Annual Report
    Our 2012 Annual Report, entitled "Creating Solutions: The ASCD Revolution in Motion," showcases the association's achievements and serves as a resource discovery tool for educators who seek programmes, products and services that empower them to support the success of each learner. We encourage you to use this online tool to learn how ASCD supports you. Read, watch and engage with stories about this year's top achievements and find out how the association supports your mission to learn, teach and lead. Visit the online report. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • ASCD announces 2013 Outstanding Young Educator Award winners
    This weekend at ASCD's 68th Annual Conference and Exhibit Show, ASCD announced the winners of the 2013 award. ASCD created the OYEA programme in 2002 to recognise creative and committed teachers and administrators under the age of 40 who are making a difference in children's lives. Learn more about the winners in a recent press release. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Learn more about ASCD ->ASCD Home Page  |  Membership  |  News  |  Store  |  Initiatives

 
Position TitleCompany NameLocation
K-12 School Teachers Needed for International SchoolsThe International EducatorMultiple Locations, International
Click here to view more job listings.

  SmartQuote 
The devil loves nothing better than the intolerance of reformers."
--James Russell Lowell,
American poet


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