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September 25, 2012
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  • NASA confirms plan to send astronauts to the moon's far side
    NASA's top officials have briefed the government on its next major mission, which focuses on building an outpost that would bring astronauts to the far side of the moon, at 277,000 miles from Earth. The "gateway spacecraft" will also serve as a staging place for operations to Mars and the moon. NASA is planning to use a massive space capsule and rocket to get to the targeted location. Orlando Sentinel (Fla.) (9/22) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Science in the News 
  • Curiosity touches a rock on Mars
    NASA's Mars Curiosity rover has successfully reached out and touched a rock, called Jake Matijevic, on the Red Planet for the first time Saturday and Sunday. The contact science operation tested the functions of the rover's tools, including the Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer, attached to the end of its 7-foot robotic arm. Curiosity began a 138-foot drive after performing the operations. Space.com (9/24) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • NASA probe records choral sounds in the Earth's magnetosphere
    Whoops and chirps in Earth's magnetosphere have been recorded by one of the two Radiation Belt Storm Probes spacecraft that NASA recently launched. The choral sounds occur in a frequency people can hear, in radio waves, as particles with lower energy transmit their energy to particles with higher energy. Space.com (9/24) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Researchers discover rich undersea life near Chagos Archipelago
    The middle of the Indian Ocean near the Chagos Archipelago is rich with underwater creatures such as silvertip sharks, rays and hammerhead sharks, according to a study by researchers, including Jessica Meeuwig of the University of Western Australia. Researchers also discovered that most of the undersea animals were gathered around a seamount, an underwater mountain. Our Amazing Planet (9/21) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Stem cells in blood play role in intestines
    Stem cells called endothelial colony-forming cells are capable of traveling to the intestine and adding to the cell populations there, indicating that they could help treat inflammatory bowel disease, researchers reported in the journal Hepatology. The blood, bone marrow and cord blood contain endothelial colony-forming cells. Yahoo!/Asian News International (9/23) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Moon Shots Program takes aim against 8 cancers
    The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston plans to invest up to $3 billion in the first 10 years of its Moon Shots Program, which will focus on accelerating the translation of research into the clinical setting to reduce cancer mortality. The program, to focus initially on eight cancers, will include various technical platforms to support research teams, including the use of imaging and proteomic methods to discover biomarkers for the early diagnosis of cancers. Houston Chronicle (9/22) , BeckersHospitalReview.com (9/21) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Scientists study biofuel potential of sweet sorghum
    Scientists at the Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Research Service say sweet sorghum has attributes that make it a good feedstock for biofuels. Sweet sorghum can tolerate parched conditions and requires minimal nitrogen fertilizer, making it a promising bioenergy crop for drought-prone areas, the ARS's Scott Sattler and Jeff Pedersen said. DomesticFuel.com (9/24) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Research Policy Regulations 
  • Publishing consortium secures open access deals with 12 journals
    The Sponsoring Consortium for Open Access Publishing in Particle Physics has negotiated deals with 12 journals, which committed to publishing and making free to read 90% of studies on high-energy physics starting in 2014. Six of those journals decided to change their business models entirely to open access from subscription. Nature (9/24) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Sigma Xi News 
  • 2012 Assembly of Delegates will be hosted virtually in November
      
    We look forward to working with our chapters and members worldwide as we come together on the Internet to share ideas and chart a course for the bright future of Sigma Xi. Won't you join us? Learn more. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story

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