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January 17, 2013
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Collaborating to advance literacy learning

  Transforming Literacy Learning 
 
  • Persuasive writing lessons are planned for English-language learners
    Middle-school students with a moderate understanding of the English language soon will be taught persuasive writing as part of a test unit that uses complex works, such as the Gettysburg Address, education reporter Lesli Maxwell writes in this blog post. Developed by Stanford University's Understanding Language team, the unit is expected to determine the resources, teacher knowledge and instructional supports required to teach a rigorous, Common Core State Standards-based curriculum to English learners. The unit will be tested by as many as 10 teachers in Charlotte-Mecklenburg, N.C., Chicago and Denver school districts. Education Week/Learning the Language blog (1/16) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 
  • Schools use different strategies to teach students to write
    School districts are employing different strategies to prepare students to complete writing assignments and assessments based on Common Core State Standards. Some schools are teaching middle-grades students how to write argumentative essays in which they have to use evidence from assigned reading to back up their ideas. "You just can't get the level of thinking with multiple-choice (test) items that you get with writing an essay," said Barbara Kapinus, director of English language arts and literacy for Smarter Balanced Assessment Consortium. District Administration magazine (1/2013) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
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  Literacy Everywhere 
  • Do digital devices encourage students to read?
    Technology has had both positive and negative effects on reading among students, according to a study released by Scholastic Inc. The study finds that more children ages 6 to 17 are using digital devices to read. However, the technology is not necessarily driving an increased desire among students to read, according to researchers who found a drop in the number of students who were self-described as frequent readers. The cause, researchers say, could be attributed to the use of tablets and other devices that allow for activities other than reading. The New York Times (tiered subscription model)/Media Decoder blog (1/13) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 
  • Google offers free tool for teaching digital literacy
    As educators struggle with how to teach students to conduct proper online research, Google's Search Education is a free resource that offers lesson plans and activities designed to teach digital literacy. To help students develop their online-research skills, the resource offers free instructor-led courses on top searching techniques, "A Google A Day" challenges and live training. EdTech magazine (1/14) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Education Policy 
  • Congress faces backlog of education laws up for renewal this year
    U.S. Congress enters this year with an "unprecedented" backlog of education laws that need updates and reauthorization, legislative observers say. The biggest obstacle is an update to the Elementary and Secondary Education Act, known as the No Child Left Behind Act, on which the parties have failed to agree. Negotiations on other education bills -- such as an update to the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act -- are linked to the passage of ESEA, so they remain sidelined in the process. Education Week (premium article access compliments of EdWeek.org) (1/16) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Leadership and Capacity Building 
  • Support, professional development are keys to retaining top teachers
    There are ways for schools to retain top teachers, even as more than half leave the profession within their first five years, write Eric Klinenberg, professor of sociology and director of the Institute for Public Knowledge at New York University, and Caitlin Zaloom, associate professor of social and cultural analysis at NYU. They suggest better preparation for new teachers; greater compensation for educators; a focus on effective, meaningful teacher evaluations and professional development; and advancement opportunities without leaving the classroom. The Christian Science Monitor (1/14) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 
  Professional Learning 
  • A do-it-yourself approach to professional development
    School leaders should abandon the traditional professional-development model in favor of more user-generated learning, writes Lyn Hilt, an elementary-school principal and technology integrator/coach. That approach, Hilt writes in this blog post, includes learning that has active curation, reflection and contribution, as educator and founding member of Edcamp, Kristen Swanson, describes in her book, "Professional Learning in the Digital Age: The Educator's Guide to User-Generated Learning." Powerful Learning Practice (1/15) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 
  • How teachers can work together to foster deeper learning
    Teachers cannot achieve deeper learning in isolation, education consultant Ben Johnson writes. Instead, he suggests in this blog post that educators form cross-curricular teaching teams, in which teachers from different departments come together to collaborate and share information. Once this is accomplished, he writes, teachers can work together to "provide a rich, rigorous, and relevant flow of knowledge and skills, and then find a way to lead the students to this water and then make them thirsty enough to drink deeply." Edutopia.org/Ben Johnson's blog (1/15) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  NCLE Spotlight 
  • (Re)Imagining content-area literacy instruction
    Roni Jo Draper's book "(Re)Imagining Content-Area Literacy Instruction" (Teachers College Press and National Writing Project, 2010) explores content-area literacy and instruction with vignettes from teachers in English, music, science, math, social studies, and more. In this chapter, Draper lays out a framework to support collaboration between literacy specialists and content-area educators. Read on. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Evidence fair: Gallery walk
    Listen in on a community of practice (COP) as group members participate in a gallery walk during a practice exchange. The instructional coach shares one middle school's work on academic talk. Participants used a reflections form to document their learning from the gallery walk. Read on. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Learn more about NCLE ->About NCLE  |  Literacy in Learning Exchange
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  SmartQuote 
Admiration is a very short-lived passion that immediately decays upon growing familiar with its object; unless it be still fed with fresh discoveries, and kept alive by a perpetual succession of miracles rising into view."
--Joseph Addison,
British writer and politician


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