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March 1, 2013
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  Top Story 
  • Study: Female smokers have 24% higher rate of breast cancer
    Researchers at the American Cancer Society found a 24% higher incidence of invasive breast cancer in women who smoke and a 13% greater incidence among former smokers, when compared with nonsmokers. The study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute said women who started smoking before first menses were 61% more likely to get breast cancer than nonsmokers. HealthDay News (2/28) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Clinical News 
  • Study ties coronary artery calcification levels to risk of stroke
    Strokes were three times more common in people with high levels of coronary artery calcification, according to a study of almost 4,200 people in Germany. "Stroke risk is tightly aligned with coronary atherosclerosis, showing the closely related nature of cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease," the study's lead researcher said. The findings were published in the journal Stroke. HealthDay News (2/28) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Study links diabetes to lower prostate cancer risk
    Diabetes was associated with a 46% lower risk of prostate cancer in men with coronary heart disease and a 36% reduced risk in those who also had metabolic syndrome, compared with men with coronary heart disease without diabetes, a study revealed. Researchers also found men with diabetes without metabolic syndrome had a 57% decreased risk of prostate cancer. The findings were published in Prostate Cancer and Prostatic Disease. Renal and Urology News (2/27) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Practice Management 
  • Prescribing on paper remains widespread, study finds
    A study by MediScripts revealed the use of paper prescriptions was more than 60% higher than use of e-prescriptions in 2012, despite advances in the technology's adoption rates. "Prescribers are considering e-prescribing systems, which are rapidly adapting to meet their needs, but until physicians gain comfort with the technology, many will continue to depend on ... pen and paper," said MediScripts CEO Erez Lapsker. Drug Store News (2/28) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Health Policy & Legislation 
  • Sequester cuts may be easier on providers than deficit deal
    Sequestration cuts in Medicare payments for physicians, hospitals and other health care providers will be 2%, which may be less than cuts in any deficit reduction package hammered out by lawmakers, health experts said. While the sequester cuts Medicare spending by $100 billion over 10 years, John Rother of the National Coalition on Health Care said the bigger worry is the possibility of a deficit reduction package that could cut from $400 billion to $500 billion. The Washington Post/The Associated Press (2/27) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Public health, medical research to suffer from sequestration
    Sequestration will have a major impact on public health and medical research, both of which have been restricted by years of underfunding and cuts. "These cuts are going to have a real impact," Washington state Health Secretary Mary Selecky said. "In the next six to eight weeks, we're going to have to say we're closed on Fridays or we can't provide this or that service anymore." Researchers who depend on NIH grants have also expressed concern that their work will have to be scaled back. Los Angeles Times (tiered subscription model) (2/27) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Professional Issues & Trends 
  • Physicians work overseas to help build local health systems
    More physicians are working abroad not just to treat patients but to help poorer countries improve their health care systems. Projects through the Peace Corps and a consortium that includes Harvard and Duke medical schools aim to train practitioners in foreign countries and also set up medical schools to sustain local health care systems. National Public Radio/Shots blog (2/26) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
  Inside the AAFP 
  • Guide patients to FamilyDoctor.org resources on obesity
    As a family physician, you know that maintaining a healthy body weight is one of the best ways to avoid weight-related health problems, such as type 2 diabetes and heart disease. But do your patients know what a healthy body weight is? FamilyDoctor.org's obesity-related resources can help you provide patients with the information they need to maintain a healthy weight and a healthy lifestyle, such as:
    • What obesity is and how it is diagnosed;
    • Risk factors for obesity;
    • Complications of obesity; and
    • Treatments for obesity, including exercise, diet, medications and surgery.
    Learn more. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  SmartQuote 
Mediocrity knows nothing higher than itself, but talent instantly recognizes genius."
--Sir Arthur Conan Doyle,
Scottish-born writer


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About AAFP
This news roundup is provided as a timely update to AAFP members and other health care professionals about family medicine topics in the news media. Links to articles are provided for the convenience of family physicians who may find them of use in discussions with patients or colleagues. Opinions expressed in AAFP SmartBrief are those of the identified authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policies of the American Academy of Family Physicians. On occasion, media articles may include or imply incorrect information about the AAFP and its policies, positions or relationships. For clarification on AAFP positions and policies, we refer you to http://aafp.org.

External Resources are not a part of the AAFP website. AAFP is not responsible for the content of sites that are external to the AAFP. Linking to a website does not constitute an endorsement by AAFP of the sponsors of the site or the information presented on the site.

 
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