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February 12, 2013
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News for nurse practitioners

  Health Care News 
 
  • Data analysis shows vitamin C may reduce duration of colds
    Analysis of data from 72 trials found that regular use of vitamin C supplements may reduce the duration of colds but does not prevent them for most people, according to a report on the website of the Cochrane Database of Systemic Reviews. Researchers from the University of Helsinki said the supplements led to about an 8% reduction in the duration of cold symptoms for adults and a 14% reduction for children. Medscape (free registration) (2/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Study: Following sodium limits would save thousands of lives
    Cutting back on salt intake from current levels to 2,300 milligrams a day -- the upper end of the federal guideline -- could save 500,000 to 850,000 lives over the next 10 years, according to research published in the journal Hypertension. Even a more gradual reduction in salt content among restaurant and processed foods could save 280,000 to 500,000 lives in 10 years, largely by reducing the risks of heart attack and stroke. U.S. News & World Report/HealthDay News (2/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Chronic stress raises risk of developing diabetes
    Chronic stress can increase the risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to a study by Swedish researchers published in the journal Diabetic Medicine. Scientists studied 7,000 men who initially had no history of diabetes, stroke or heart disease and found over the course of the 35-year study that those who reported permanent stress were 45% more likely to develop type 2 diabetes than men who reported periodic episodes of stress or no stress. Diabetes.co.uk (U.K.) (2/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • High BP during pregnancy may mean higher risk later in life
    High blood pressure during pregnancy means a greater risk of heart disease, kidney problems and diabetes later in life, even with only one or two high blood pressure readings, according to a study in the journal Circulation. Women whose blood pressure returned to normal after pregnancy were still 1.6 to 2.5 times more likely to develop subsequent high blood pressure requiring hospitalization or treatment. HealthDay News (2/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Prenatal intake of omega-3s may not boost brain development
    Data from 11 clinical trials on the effect of omega-3 fatty acid supplementation during pregnancy on a child's brain development showed that such supplements had neither a positive nor negative effect on visual or neurological capacity. Since a majority of the trials had very few participants, excluded difficult pregnancies and failed to monitor the children long enough, Australian researchers said that more research is needed. The study was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Reuters (2/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Most children with type 1 diabetes are above target HbA1C levels
    U.S. researchers looked at 13,316 type 1 diabetes patients and found that 64% of those younger than 6 met the American Diabetes Association's hemoglobin A1C target of less than 8.5%. They said that only 43% of patients age 6 to younger than 13 years and 21% of those age 13 to younger than 20 years met their respective HbA1C targets. The findings appear in the journal Diabetes Care. PhysiciansBriefing.com/HealthDay News (2/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Pharmaceutical News 
  • Endovascular therapy doesn't improve outcomes for stroke survivors
    Endovascular therapy plus intravenous tissue plasminogen activator treatment showed little advantage over IV tPA alone in terms of promoting independent living 90 days after a stroke, a study found. However, endovascular therapy was more effective than tPA alone in removing clots and re-establishing blood flow. The findings appear in the New England Journal of Medicine. Nurse.com (2/10) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Emerging Trends, Products and Technologies 
  • Spending on health care rose 4.3% in 2012
    Research by the Altarum Institute's Center for Sustainable Health Spending found that health care spending in 2012 went up 4.3%. "While slightly above the flat three-year experience of 3.9%, our data demonstrates continued historically low health care spending growth," Altarum's Charles Roehrig said. Health care prices rose the least since 1998, inching up 1.7% from December 2011 to December 2012. BenefitsPro.com (2/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Health Policy and Legislative News 
  AANP News 
  • Reforms save health care providers $676M annually
    Reforms to Medicare regulations identified as unnecessary, obsolete or excessively burdensome for hospitals and health care providers would save nearly $676 million annually, and $3.4 billion over five years, through a rule proposed by the CMS. "We are committed to cutting the red tape for health care facilities, including rural providers," said HHS Secretary Kathleen Sebelius. "By eliminating outdated or overly burdensome requirements, hospitals and health care professionals can focus on treating patients." The proposed rule is designed to help health care providers to operate more efficiently by getting rid of regulations that are out of date or no longer needed. Many of the rule's provisions streamline the standards health care providers must meet in order to participate in the Medicare and Medicaid programs without jeopardizing beneficiary safety. View the proposed rule. View the May 2012 final rules. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Editor's Note 
  • Correction
    A news item and subject line in Monday's AANP SmartBrief incorrectly described a bill passed by the Oregon state Senate. The legislation would expand dispensing powers to nurse practitioners in urban areas. NPs in Oregon already can prescribe medications. SmartBrief regrets the error. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  SmartQuote 
We spend our time searching for security and hate it when we get it."
--John Steinbeck,
American author


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