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March 12, 2013
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News for nurse practitioners

  Health Care News 
 
  • For new moms, heart attack risk is higher with obesity
    An analysis of data from more than 273,000 young new mothers in Denmark found that obese women faced double the risk of heart attacks and strokes in the five years after giving birth. For underweight women, the risk was slightly elevated. The findings were presented at the annual meeting of American College of Cardiology. HealthDay News (3/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Research finds inappropriate colonoscopies in older patients
    Twenty-three percent of colonoscopies performed in patients age 70 and older may be inappropriate, according to a study of Texas patients reported in JAMA Internal Medicine, and among those 76 to 85, up to 39% were considered inappropriate. Researchers also found more than 40% of tests performed by some physicians involved patients who likely did not need the screening. "There's very limited data for any cancer test that it leads to any benefit for older adults," said Dr. Mara Schonberg. Reuters (3/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Study finds mixed results for benign oophorectomy
    A study in Obstetrics & Gynecology found women who choose bilateral oophorectomy during hysterectomy for benign reasons may have a lower risk of ovarian cancer death than women who keep their ovaries, but the procedure did not reduce risk of other mortality and was linked to higher mortality risk among some of those who had not used estrogen therapy. Women who face high risk of ovarian and breast cancer should strongly consider the procedure, researchers noted, but "the association of oophorectomy with increased mortality in the overall population has substantial public health implications." Medscape (free registration) (3/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Weight gain during pregnancy raises C-section risk
    Gaining 35 pounds or more during pregnancy increases a woman's risk of cesarean section, forceps or vacuum-extraction delivery, according to a study involving more than 50,000 women in Norway. Being overweight and obese before pregnancy also raised a woman's risk of cesarean delivery. The study appeared in the journal Acta Obstetricia et Gynecologica Scandinavica. HealthDay News (3/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • CDC report links pet frogs to salmonella outbreak
    Sixty-seven percent of patients who were infected with Salmonella typhimurium during a nationwide outbreak between 2008 and 2011 were exposed to African dwarf frogs in the week before they became sick, a CDC report found. The investigators said pediatricians should warn parents and patients of the risks associated with pet frogs. The findings appear in the journal Pediatrics. Reuters (3/11), CNN/The Chart blog (3/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Pharmaceutical News 
  • GLP-1 drugs may reduce risk of heart failure in diabetes
    Diabetes patients who took GLP-1 drugs were 41% less likely than those who took other glucose-lowering drugs to be hospitalized for heart failure, a study presented at the American College of Cardiology meeting indicated. Patients on GLP-1 drugs also had a 44% reduced risk of hospitalization for any reason and 80% lower risk of all-cause mortality compared with those on other diabetes medications, researchers said. DoctorsLounge.com/HealthDay News (3/10) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Many add-on cholesterol drugs are ineffective, research finds
    Niaspan, Lovaza, Zetia and Vytorin are often prescribed along with a statin to further reduce patients' risk of stroke or heart attack, but the drugs have not proven to do so, and new research finds prescription niacin may increase bleeding, infection and diabetes risks. "So at least $4.5 billion was spent on drugs with uncertain benefit and known risks," said Dr. James Stein of the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health. Milwaukee Journal Sentinel (tiered subscription model) (3/9) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Emerging Trends, Products and Technologies 
  • What does the future hold for nursing in the U.S.?
    An increasing emphasis on the postgraduate education of nurses is key not only to improving patient outcomes but also to meeting the demand for nursing school faculty, says Carol Brewer, a professor at the University at Buffalo's nursing school. It's important for the health system to support nurses' full scope of practice, she says. "Laws designed to protect turf that do not improve quality are not useful. The real issue is money -- loss of income for physicians who can bill for collaborating with nurse practitioners," she says. The Buffalo News (N.Y.) (3/9) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 
  Health Policy and Legislative News 
  • Public comment period on ACA's individual mandate nears end
    HHS and the CMS are taking public comments through March 18 on rules that establish the Affordable Care Act's individual mandate. The penalty for not getting health insurance will be applicable to "the limited group of taxpayers who choose to spend a substantial period of time without coverage despite having ready access to affordable coverage," according to HHS. The Hill/RegWatch blog (3/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  AANP News 
  • Access Early View for JAANP
    Check out what is coming in future issues by accessing Early View. There are normally 25-30 articles posted online ahead of print in Early View. Articles posted in Early View are considered fully published and can be cited with the DOI number, which is prominently displayed in the citation information. There is no need to wait for articles to appear in print with JAANP Early View. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  SmartQuote 
We are all worms. But I do believe that I am a glow-worm."
--Winston Churchill,
British prime minister


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