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January 3, 2013
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Working to create positive images of girls and women in media and entertainment

  Gender In Media 
  • Action-driven female characters break stereotypes in 2012 films
    Moviegoers got a full complement of strong female characters in 2012’s filmmaking that cut across genres to deliver an action-packed kick to the Hollywood gender gap. Noomi Rapace, Jessica Chastain, Salma Hayek and Jennifer Lawrence were among the actors to take on stereotype-breaking roles in major 2012 films. Women's eNews (12/28) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Women's voices heard in the media throughout 2012
    Women's voices rose to the foreground across a variety of media outlets in 2012 with the use of social media to drive campaigns around high-profile women's issues. From New Jersey teenagers' use of social media to drive a petition for a female presidential debate moderator to a public backlash against Rush Limbaugh for derogatory comments about a female Georgetown University student, the social media and traditional media airwaves crackled with discussions on issues women deemed important. Women's eNews (12/31) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Trends & Insights 
  • What's essential to encourage women to lead?
    While "hard work and perseverance" are critical in the development of women as leaders, Lucy Marcus notes there are five essentials elements to training women to become leaders. Providing girls with encouragement at a young age, as well as giving women access to basic skills, international experience, mentoring and strong role models have been identified as key components to fostering women as leaders. LinkedIn Blog (1/1) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Yale microbiologist honored for gender bias work
    Yale microbiologist Jo Handelsman has been named by Nature magazine as one of the "10 people who mattered in 2012" for her work on gender bias in science. Handelsman’s gender bias research, which appeared in the journal National Academy of Sciences, involved presenting 100 male and female scientists with job applications to assess and found that women were consistently rated a less competent and offered smaller salaries. Yale Daily News (Yale University) (12/26) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Ideas in Action 
  • Time has come to end military-exclusion policies for women
    Military policies designed to keep servicewomen from the front lines of battle have been rendered moot by tactics employed by insurgents in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the time has come to end the combat-exclusion policies in force, write Katie Miller and Lindsay Rosenthal of the Center for American Progress. The current policies ignore current battleground realities and adversely affect servicewomen's career options and their ability to access veterans' benefits. Center for American Progress (12/20) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  SmartQuote 
Birds sing after a storm; why shouldn't people feel as free to delight in whatever remains to them?"
--Rose Kennedy,
American philanthropist


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About Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media
Six years ago, while watching children's entertainment with her young daughter, Academy Award winner Geena Davis noticed a remarkable imbalance in the ratio of male to female characters. From that small starting point, Davis commissioned the largest research study ever undertaken on gender in children's entertainment. The research showed that in the top-grossing G-rated films, there were three male characters for every one female - a statistic that still has not improved. The Institute is the leading resource for gender in media research, trends and education for the entertainment industry and the public. The Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and See Jane are a project of Community Partners.
 
About See Jane
See Jane is a program of the Institute that utilizes research, education and advocacy to engage the entertainment industry and recognize the need for gender balance and varied portrayals of females and male characters into movies, TV, and other media aimed at children 11 and under. We work cooperatively and collaboratively with entertainment creators to encourage them to be leaders in creating positive change.
 
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Madeline Di Nonno
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