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January 30, 2013
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  Top Story 
 
  • CDC: Vaccination rates for certain diseases "unacceptably low"
    CDC officials reported Tuesday that vaccination rates for certain diseases -- including pneumonia, tetanus, diphtheria, hepatitis, shingles and whooping cough -- were "unacceptably low" among U.S. adults. "We are encouraging all adults to talk with their health care providers about which vaccines are appropriate for them," said HHS assistant secretary Dr. Howard Koh. Reuters (1/29) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 9 Tips to Bring Order to Hospital Communications Chaos
With the amount of information today's healthcare technology generates, communications have become intricate webs of guesswork, unknown mobile devices, confusing schedules, and just too many systems going beep. In this paper you'll find nine tips to cope with this chaos and give it the order your patients and staff so desperately need. Download white paper now >
 

  Nursing, Health & Medical Science 
 
  • Cancer gene mutations may raise odds of early menopause
    Women with mutations in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene hit menopause a few years earlier than those without such mutations, according to a study to be published in the journal Cancer. BRCA1/BRCA2 carriers who smoked 20 or more cigarettes daily experienced onset of menopause even sooner, at an average age of 46, researchers said. Nurse.com (1/29) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Leafy greens are leading source of foodborne illnesses in U.S.
    Of the nearly 50% of foodborne-illnesses linked to farm produce, 22% were caused by leafy green vegetables, according to a CDC study in the journal Emerging Infectious Diseases. Meat, especially poultry, accounted for 43% of all deaths resulting from foodborne diseases, researchers said. HealthDay News (1/29) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Study links prostate cancer risk to fried foods
    Men who ate deep-fried foods such as french fries or fried chicken once a week or more were up to 37% more likely to develop prostate cancer than were those who ate deep-fried foods less than once a month, according to a study of about 3,000 men. Fried foods also were associated with a slightly higher risk of developing more aggressive prostate cancer. The findings appeared on the website of the journal The Prostate. HealthDay News (1/28) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Pediatric hypertension may be less prevalent than thought
    U.S. researchers looked at 199,513 children ages 3 to 7 and found that most of them had normal blood pressure levels, while 12.7% had prehypertension and 5.4% had BP levels within the hypertension range. They noted that blacks and Asians had a higher prevalence of hypertension than other groups. Both increasing age and body mass index were substantially linked to prehypertension and hypertension, according to the study in Pediatrics. PhysiciansBriefing.com/HealthDay News (1/28) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Postpartum hemorrhage doesn't pose greater pregnancy risks
    Women who experienced heavy bleeding during their first childbirth were no more likely to suffer from a miscarriage and other pregnancy complications in the future, a study in the journal BJOG found. About 18% of those who had a history of postpartum hemorrhage bled heavily during their second childbirth, compared with 7% of women who didn't have heavy bleeding during their first childbirth. Reuters (1/29) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
New Reference on Caring for Older Patients
Nursing Care of the Hospitalized Older Patient gives hospital nurses vital information on the full range of health issues encountered by elderly patients. Starting with the basics, the book moves into coverage of disorders all organized by body system for easy reference. Order your copy today.
  Trends & Technologies 
  • Report calls for U.S. to move toward preventive health model
    The nonprofit Trust for America's Health proposed shifting U.S. health care from a sick-care model to a prevention format, and while executive director Jeffrey Levi called it the humanitarian thing to do, economists disagreed with the group's assessment that it would reduce costs. Data show some preventive services may not improve an individual's health, and health policy expert Peter Neumann of Tufts University School of Medicine said that "prevention itself costs money, and some preventive measures can be very expensive, especially if you give them to a lot of people who won't benefit." Reuters (1/29) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Pediatricians issue guidelines on type 2 diabetes
    The American Academy of Pediatrics, in collaboration with the American Diabetes Association and other groups, is releasing its first-ever guidelines on managing type 2 diabetes in children. The recommendations, published in the journal Pediatrics, advise screening all obese children for diabetes, encouraging a healthy diet and physical activity, and using early aggressive treatment with medication for some children. Time.com/Healthland blog (1/28), The Wall Street Journal (1/28) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Work-Life Balance 
  • Changing roles lead more nurses toward advanced degrees
    The need for more primary care providers and an unstable economy are among the factors driving nurses in Indiana and other states to seek advanced degrees and to work in settings such in outpatient clinics, home care and community health centers. The need for nurses with advanced degrees will further increase under the Affordable Care Act, said Kimberly Harper, director of the Indiana Center for Nursing. "When more people have access to insurance, there will be an increase in people seeking care, especially primary care," Harper said. Journal and Courier (Lafayette, Ind.) (1/27) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Some nursing schools put focus on doctoral programs
    Some nursing schools are focused on doctoral rather than master's programs for training advanced practice nurses, said Susan Kimble, clinical associate professor and MSN and DNP program director at the University of Missouri-Kansas City School of Nursing. Judith Fitzgerald Miller, dean of the University of Missouri's Sinclair School of Nursing, said advanced practice nurses will need doctorates "in this complex health care environment." The Kansas City Nursing News (1/15) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  ANA News 
Learn more about ANA ->ANA Homepage | Members Only | Nursesbooks.org | Events | Career Center

Position TitleCompany NameLocation
Hospice RN Case ManagerUnitedHealth GroupTuscon, AZ
NURSING ASSISTANT-SPT-.900-72/PP-DAYS/PM'S-COMMUNITY MEMORIAL HOSPITAL-MENOMONEE FALLS, WIFroedtert HealthMenomonee Falls, WI
Psychiatric Advanced Practice RNKaiser PermanenteSuitland, MD
Part Time Health Coach in London, OHUnitedHealth GroupColumbus, OH
Behavioral Health Care Advocate - Telecommute - New York OnlyUnitedHealth GroupAlbany, NY
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  SmartQuote 
Resentment is like taking poison and waiting for the other person to die."
--Malachy McCourt,
Irish-American actor, writer and politician


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