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February 12, 2013
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News for professionals focused on the health of women and newborns

  Women's Health Update 
  • Biennial mammograms for older women backed by large study
    The risk of having breast cancer detected at a late stage was no higher for older women who received mammograms every two years rather than annually, according to a study of more than 140,000 women ages 66 to 89. Annual mammograms were associated with an increased risk of false positives. The study appeared online in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. WebMD/HealthDay News (2/5) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Study ties women's bone mass to higher BMI
    Women who had high bone mass were nearly 20 pounds heavier and had a 4.5% lower portion of lean body mass than those in the control group of a study that suggests bone mass may be linked with BMI. Researchers noted "a particular tendency toward central adiposity" among patients with high bone mass and suggest the relationship is a causative one, but more study is needed. The findings were published in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism. Healio/Endocrine Today (2/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Obstetrics Focus 
 
  • Exercise may improve fetal, maternal health with gestational diabetes
    Regular moderate-intensity exercise may help boost fetal and maternal health in pregnant women with gestational diabetes mellitus, a study in the British Journal of Sports Medicine found. Patients in the exercise group also had a lower risk of macrosomia and were less likely than the control group to need an acute or elective cesarean delivery, researchers noted. Diabetes.co.uk (U.K.) (2/5) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Air pollution may raise odds of pregnancy complications
    Pregnant women who were exposed to high levels of smog during their first trimester had an elevated risk of complications including preeclampsia and premature birth, a report in BMJ Open found. Researchers also found the odds of preeclampsia and premature delivery were 10% and 25% higher, respectively, in women with asthma than in those without the condition. HealthDay News (2/6) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • CDC report finds continued decline in U.S. teen birth rate
    The teen birth rate in the U.S. declined by 8% between 2010 and 2011, with just over 3% of teens ages 15 to 19 giving birth during the study period, a CDC study found. Rates of premature birth and low birth weight continued to drop, but the infant mortality rate remained unchanged, researchers reported in the journal Pediatrics. Reuters (2/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
Nursing@Georgetown
Experience the innovative online Master of Science in nursing program from Georgetown University School of Nursing & Health Studies. This degree is available in several specialties, including Nurse Practitioner programs. Nursing@Georgetown offers a rigorous curriculum, live class sessions, and clinical experiences near students' homes. Click here for more information.
  AWHONN Spotlight on Research 
 
  • Warm showers provide pain relief during labor
    Pregnant women can reduce pain and improve the birth experience by taking warm showers during early labor, suggests a new study published in JOGNN. The findings, conclude the authors, point to warm showers as a cost-effective, convenient and easy alternative to pain medication and epidurals -- without the potential side effects. The study involved 80 women delivering at a Taipei hospital who were randomly assigned to receive 20-minute warm (37º C) showers as frequently as desired, provided labor progressed normally, or to standard childbirth care. Labor pain was monitored using standardized scales at 4-centimeters and 7-cm dilation, and birth experience was similarly measured following delivery. Women in the warm-shower group reported significantly lower pain scores at each period. At 10 and 20 minutes after the intervention, mean pain scores for the experimental group dropped significantly, while increasing significantly for the control group. Women who took warm showers also had higher mean scores assessing birth experience. Read the article. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Unite Healthcare’s Critical Disciplines as an MSN: CNL
Earn an online MSN with a Clinical Nurse Leader® track from Queens University of Charlotte and elevate safety, quality and patient outcomes. CNLs unite interdisciplinary healthcare providers to deliver comprehensive patient care. At Queens you'll develop in-demand skills for this growing nursing role and gain a valuable credential. Start now.

  Neonatal Health 
 
  • Bleeding stroke may raise risk of seizures, epilepsy in children
    U.S. researchers assessed 73 pediatric survivors of bleeding strokes and found that about 60% of the babies and 43% of the older children had seizures during the stroke or within a week following the stroke. The study, to be published in the journal JAMA Neurology, showed that 13% of the patients were diagnosed with epilepsy within two years. HealthDay News (2/7) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
The New You Starts Here.
Designed for busy healthcare professionals, FIU's online Healthcare MBA is transformative. Graduates emerge ready for a leadership role in healthcare, with a clear vision of how to lead collaboratively and advance the business of healthcare. Classes begin Fall 2015. Start here.

  AWHONN News 
  • Explore your options in Music City!
    More than 3,000 nurses and other health care professionals will converge on Music City in 2013 to discover tools to help ensure excellence in care for women and newborns. The AWHONN convention offers more than 100 educational sessions, workshops, paper presentations and other events that provide tools and strategies to improve the quality of patient care and safety. A complete list of courses and programs for the conference is at  www.awhonnconvention.org. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Help AWHONN guide its consumer media, write for publication
    Healthy Mom&Baby is expanding its Editorial Advisory Board as well as its author pool. Would you like to help AWHONN develop its consumer media, including its magazine, website (www.health4mom.org), iPad app and social media? Would you like to write short articles (450 words or so) about important women’s health, mother/baby, infant care and parenting topics? We're specifically looking for nurses with experience in educating or writing for consumers from an evidence-based perspective. Learn more by emailing your CV and a short note explaining your interest in Healthy Mom&Baby to AWHONN Publications Director Carolyn Cockey at carolyndc@awhonn.org or by calling (877) 377-5326. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Learn more about AWHONN ->Join AWHONN/Renew Membership  |  Member Center  |  Journals & Research  |  AWHONN Store  |  Events & Webinars  |  Contact Us

  SmartQuote 
Do not teach your children never to be angry; teach them how to be angry."
--Lyman Abbott,
American theologian, author and editor


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Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

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