Reading this on a mobile device? Try our optimized mobile version here: http://r.smartbrief.com/resp/eirvCfbwoceZzkpVzLtv

January 28, 2013
Sign upForwardArchiveAdvertise
News for the Pet Industry

  Industry Watch 
  • Ownership of horses and birds is down, AVMA study finds
    In addition to tracking dog and cat care and ownership, the American Veterinary Medical Association's U.S. Pet Ownership and Demographics Sourcebook sheds light on other species. Ownership of birds fell 20.5% from 2006 to 2011, while horse ownership fell 33% over the same period. The report also documents declines in ownership of rabbits and fish. AVMA President Dr. Douglas Aspros said the reasons for the declines aren't entirely clear, but the economy is likely part of the equation. "Owning, feeding, housing and caring for horses is costly," Aspros noted. He also said that birds are not as readily available as they used to be. However, the issue is likely more complex than simple economics, Aspros said: "There are several surveys which indicate people are willing to spend, arguably more than ever, on their pets." Chicago Tribune (tiered subscription model) (1/23) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Pet owners reveal the perks enjoyed by their animal companions
    A Pet360 survey of owners sheds light on the lengths people go to in pampering their pets. More than 99% of respondents said their pets are considered family members, and 75% said they would prefer to have their pets with them on a deserted island rather than a human. More than 42% of owners don't want to vacation without their pets, and more than 40% admit sneaking their pets into public areas such as stores. Pet360 (1/22) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Neutering prevents pet overpopulation and safeguards pet health
    Spaying or neutering a pet is an important preventive health measure as well as a means of limiting the number of homeless pets, writes veterinarian Ann Hohenhaus, who notes that the American Veterinary Medical Association's Guidelines for Responsible Pet Ownership encourage owners to help keep the pet population under control. During a neuter operation, a veterinarian removes a male dog's testicles, the main source of testosterone. This prevents the dog from siring puppies and protects it from testosterone-related problems including behavior issues and health threats such as prostate cancer, Hohenhaus points out. WebMD/Tales from the Pet Clinic blog (1/23) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Top Trends and Product News 
  • Bovine tuberculosis detected in dairy cow in Wash.
    After a U.S. Department of Agriculture inspector saw a suspicious lesion on a cow in Washington state, testing of the tissue identified bovine tuberculosis, and officials are confirming the results with a second test. There is no threat to human health, since the cow was removed from the food chain and milk from its dairy is pasteurized, which kills the pathogen, according to a state agriculture official. The dairy has been quarantined until 1,500 of its cattle can be tested for the disease, although bovine TB usually only surfaces in 1% to 4% of cows in close proximity to an infected cow, the official said. The Columbia Basin Herald (Moses Lake, Wash.) (1/22) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Dogs at work: A well-planned program can benefit everyone
    It's possible that allowing employees to bring their dogs to work could improve a company's bottom line, according to this article, which notes that powerhouses including Amazon and Google allow dogs in the office. Potential upsides include better employee satisfaction and productivity, fewer missed workdays and increased congeniality at work. However, employers need to have clear rules about cleaning up after pets, training of animals and dealing with aggression, as well as a plan to address the possibility of allergies among workers. 4Hoteliers (1/22) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Regulatory & Government Issues 
  • U.S. takes step toward allowing chicken imports from China
    The U.S. is poised to send inspectors to chicken processing plants in China, which could ultimately open the way for expanded meat trade between the countries, including allowing chicken imports from China. Concerns about the safety of chicken from China have contributed to delays in talks regarding the issue. Under current regulations, China may only sell chicken to the U.S. in the form of pet food. The Food and Drug Administration is looking into reports of canine illnesses and deaths associated with chicken jerky treats for dogs that were made in China. AutomatedTrader.net/Dow Jones Newswires (1/22) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  SmartQuote 
If fate means you to lose, give him a good fight anyhow."
--William McFee,
British-American writer


LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story

 
The news summaries appearing in the APPA SmartBrief are based on original information from news organizations and are produced by SmartBrief, Inc., an independent e-mail newsletter publisher. The APPA is not responsible for the content of sites that are external to the APPA. Linking to a website does not constitute an endorsement by the APPA of the site or the information presented on the site. Questions and comments should be directed to SmartBrief at appa@smartbrief.com.
 
Subscriber Tools
     
Print friendly format | Web version | Search past news | Archive | Privacy policy

Advertise
Account Director:  Aaron Lawrence (202) 499-2123
 
Read more at SmartBrief.com
A powerful website for SmartBrief readers including:
 
 
 Recent APPA SmartBrief Issues:   Lead Editor:  Liz DeHoff
     
Mailing Address:
SmartBrief, Inc.®, 555 11th ST NW, Suite 600, Washington, DC 20004
 
 
© 1999-2013 SmartBrief, Inc.® Legal Information