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February 19, 2013
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News for professionals focused on the health of women and newborns

  Women's Health Update 
  • Study examines link between EHR use, health service referrals
    Providers using EHRs are more likely to refer women for mammograms and other preventive care, including pelvic and breast examinations, according to research in the Journal of the American Medical Informatics Association. Providers without EHRs had the lowest referral rates for all but two tests involving women's health, researchers found. HealthImaging.com (2/13) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
December is the New January! Time to Invest in Your Health.
Capital Health Coach works to engage you in your own health & wellness. Our team specializes in everything from nutrition, exercise, weight-loss and even mindfulness practice. We tailor our coaching to meet your desired goals, and believe that your health is your greatest asset. Take time to care for yourself—and the best part is we connect with you over the phone!

  Obstetrics Focus 
 
  • Some hormonal contraceptives may raise diabetes risk
    Long-acting reversible contraceptives were associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes in obese women, according to a study in the journal Contraception. Data on three types of birth-control methods showed women who had progestin-releasing LARC devices implanted under the skin had a 10% increase in fasting blood glucose levels, compared with a 5% increase in those who used a progestin-releasing IUD and a 2% decrease in those who opted for non-hormonal contraceptives. Toronto Sun/QMI Agency (2/8), NewKerala.com (India)/Asian News International (2/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • IVF doesn't increase women's cancer risk, study finds
    In vitro fertilization and other fertility treatments yielded similar odds of developing breast or endometrial cancer, according to a study in the journal Fertility & Sterility. Researchers found that exposure to IVF treatments were linked to a slightly raised risk of ovarian cancer, but the difference wasn't large enough to rule out chance as a cause. Reuters (2/17) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Conception odds rise with aspirin after some miscarriages
    Daily use of low-dose aspirin while trying to conceive was associated with increased chances of giving birth after a single recent miscarriage before 20 weeks gestation, according to a study involving 1,228 women. Aspirin, however, failed to benefit women who had one or two miscarriages at any gestational age. The study was presented at a meeting of the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine. MedPage Today (free registration) (2/16) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
Nursing@Georgetown
Experience the innovative online Master of Science in nursing program from Georgetown University School of Nursing & Health Studies. This degree is available in several specialties, including Nurse Practitioner programs. Nursing@Georgetown offers a rigorous curriculum, live class sessions, and clinical experiences near students' homes. Click here for more information.
  Neonatal Health 
  • HHS offers grants to boost prenatal care
    HHS on Friday introduced an initiative, Strong Start for Mothers and Newborns, aimed at lowering the number of premature births under Medicaid and the Children's Health Insurance Program. Communities with high rates of premature birth will be given funding to improve prenatal care. The Hill/Healthwatch blog (2/15) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Smoke-free laws may lead to lower premature birth rates
    Data from 606,877 live, singleton babies born in Flanders, Belgium, between 2002 and 2011 showed a decline in the number of preterm births following the implementation of smoke-free laws beginning in 2007. Belgian researchers found no evidence of a downward trend in preterm births in the years or months before the smoking bans. The findings appear in the British Medical Journal. Reuters (2/14) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Study ties maternal obesity to excessive birth weight
    Black women who were obese before they got pregnant and those who gained excess weight during pregnancy were at greater risk of having babies with macrosomia, according to a study in the journal Obesity. Researchers noted that mothers with a body mass index of more than 31 had twice the risk of delivering large babies. HealthDay News (2/14) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
How Much Do You Really Need to Make? The Answer May Shock You
Rather than focus on what you can afford to pull out of the business to cover your living expenses, you need to focus on how much you need to earn at your business in order to afford the lifestyle you want to have. This is where the Personal Earnings Goal, or PEG, comes into play. Learn how to calculate your PEG and find out how much you really need to make.

  AWHONN News 
  • Discover the benefits of AWHONN membership today!
    Join AWHONN today and instantly become a part of an exciting and growing network of more than 24,000 health care professionals with access to the critical information and support they need to provide the highest quality of care to women and newborns. Become a member now and start taking advantage of member benefits including your FREE subscriptions to Nursing for Women's Health and the Journal of Obstetric, Gynecologic and Neonatal Nursing (JOGNN), exclusive member-only discounts on webinars and resources in the AWHONN store, AWHONN convention discounts and so much more! Visit www.awhonn.org/benefits for more information. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • HRSA announces funding opportunity on nursing workforce diversity
    To demonstrate the Division of Nursing's focus and commitment to the social determinants of health and health equity, the funding opportunity announcement requires applicants to propose innovative workforce diversity projects that offer multi-level, evidence-based approaches that incorporate the social determinants of health into strategies to diversify the nursing workforce and move towards health equity. We would like to invite you to broadly share this FOA with your contacts. Eligible applicants are academic health centers, state or local governments, community-based organizations, tribes and tribal organizations, accredited schools of nursing and nursing centers. We are also looking for qualified reviewers as well. More info. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  SmartQuote 
The right to be let alone is indeed the beginning of all freedoms."
--William O. Douglas,
U.S. Supreme Court justice


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Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

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