Reading this on a mobile device? Try our optimized mobile version here: http://r.smartbrief.com/resp/efzMCfbwoceZgykFqmVk

January 21, 2013News for commercial building design and construction professionals

  • Report: As much as $700B a year needed to deal with rising temps
    In addition to the $5 trillion a year the world needs to spend on infrastructure development, it could need an additional $700 billion annually to help limit temperature increases, according to a report for the World Economic Forum by Accenture. The World Bank forecasts a temperature increase of 7.2 degrees Fahrenheit over this century. The WEF says spending is necessary to beef up "renewable power, low-carbon transport and energy efficiency." Bloomberg Businessweek (1/21) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 IN THIS ISSUE
Products, Innovation & Technology:  3D city modeling plays important role in urban planning  (More stories below ...)

Sustainability & Green Building:  A highway runs through it  (More stories below ...)

Advancing Your Career:  How quiet focus can make you a better leader 

Hot Topics:  Slide show: Winning entries in ENR's 2012 construction-photo contest  (More stories below ...)

News from CSI:  Sustainability Practice Group meeting: Advocacy or Objectivity? Specifying for a Sustainable Project  (More stories below ...)


  Products, Innovation & Technology 
  • 3D city modeling plays important role in urban planning
    Three-dimensional city modeling could show and animate urban features such as road networks and building heights, which could aid in organizing placement of structures and be a tool to help future decision-making, this article notes. Three-dimensional "simulations of cities have the potential to help engineers and planners anticipate natural disasters and population growth, and to better plan for them in a way that goes far beyond rendering cityscapes as if they were in a video game," Emily Badger writes. The Atlantic Cities (1/18) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Quality concerns arise at $12 billion Hanford site in Wash.
    The top engineer at the $12 billion Hanford nuclear waste treatment plant in Washington suggested in December that "all activities affecting engineering design, nuclear safety, and construction and installation of all structures, systems and components be stopped" because of quality concerns. He has since left his position. However, the Department of Energy says the project's "technical uncertainties" have been dealt with, the project will continue and the department "as appropriate, will ramp up construction work not impacted by the remaining technical issues." The Oregonian (Portland) (1/16), Engineering News-Record (1/10) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Sustainability & Green Building 
  • A highway runs through it
    India may take a hint from Japan to help solve its road-infrastructure challenges. An Indian ministry official has suggested building roads through high-rise buildings, just as was done at the Gate Tower Building in Japan. That 16-story building has an expressway that occupies three floors. The road was built as a bridge and is secured by free-standing supports so that it is not attached to the tower. DesignBuildSource.com.au (Australia) (1/18) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • D.C. authority proposes halting water tunnel projects
    Back in 2003, the District of Columbia Water and Sewer Authority proposed building three tunnels to help manage sewer overflows. It now proposes suspending construction of the tunnels in favor of doing an eight-year study on green infrastructure to see if there are more sustainable options to deal with the problem. "At the end of that analysis, we will make a recommendation to the Environmental Protection Agency to do [an] all-green, all-tunnel or some hybrid program," said Pamela Mooring, the authority's external communications manager. The Hoya (Georgetown University) (1/18) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Advancing Your Career 
  • How quiet focus can make you a better leader
    Taking time to slow down at work can help you become calm, focused and noticed when others need the same help, Mary Jo Asmus writes. She suggests building time into your day to set intentions, pausing before reacting and talking with co-workers, not at them. "Look them in the eye and listen deeper than you ever have," she suggests. "You might find that you really don't need to say much at all." SmartBrief/SmartBlog on Leadership (1/16) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Hot Topics 

Top five news stories selected by CSI NewsBrief readers in the past week.

  • Results based on number of times each story was clicked by readers.
  News from CSI 
  • Sustainability Practice Group meeting: Advocacy or Objectivity? Specifying for a Sustainable Project
    Tuesday, 3 p.m. ET
    Presenter: Ujjval Vyas, CSI


    Specifying for a sustainable project can be confusing and fraught with difficulties. It is especially difficult to differentiate between the professional role of the design professional/specifier and the non-professional role as cheerleader for sustainability. Owners and the full gamut of other parties on a sustainable project look to the specifier to provide the detailed analysis of products, assemblies, and systems to avoid frivolous, questionable, or even worse claims or applications by suppliers, manufacturers, and green consultants (advocates). Specifiers can provide a real service to the sustainable project as a whole when they maintain a clear separation between advocacy and objectivity, and help others to do the same. This session discusses three prominent current examples of the confusion between advocacy and objectivity in the sustainable buildings arena: health outcomes, worker productivity increases, and increased asset valuation. Learn more, or join this practice group. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Learn more about CSI ->Home Page  |  About CSI  |  Join  |  Formats  |  Education  |  Certification  |  CONSTRUCT Show

  SmartQuote 
Give me six hours to chop down a tree and I will spend the first four sharpening the axe."
--Abraham Lincoln,
16th U.S. president


LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story

 
Subscriber Tools
     
Print friendly format | Web version | Search past news | Privacy policy
 
Editorial Team
Lead Editor:  Jennifer Hicks
     
Advertise
Associate Publisher:  Kathy Dowdy 469-305-7122

 
 Recent CSI NewsBrief Issues:   Mailing Address:
SmartBrief, Inc.®, 555 11th ST NW, Suite 600, Washington, DC 20004
 
 
© 1999-2013 SmartBrief, Inc.® Legal Information