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May 16, 2012
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Leading Edge 
  • What leaders can learn from your average burger
    The best bosses are like tasty burgers, Kevin Eikenberry writes. Like a good leader, a high-quality hamburger is unassuming, versatile and combines available resources -- meat, cheese, bun -- into something that didn't exist before the process started. "The individual parts that make up the hamburger are all important, but it is the whole that matters," Eikenberry writes. KevinEikenberry.com (5/14) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
  • Can Facebook manage a team of millionaires?
    Facebook's initial public offering will leave about 1,000 people worth at least $1 million on paper, many of whom are employees of the social network. Experts say that managing a team of suddenly wealthy employees presents big challenges, and that the social network will have to convince workers that they're still at an important, cutting-edge company. "You want Facebook to be 'the next Facebook,'" says consultant Terry Flanagan. The Wall Street Journal (5/15) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
Strategic Management 
  • How Jimmyjane helped adult toys go mainstream
    Jimmyjane founder Ethan Imboden has brought an Apple-style, design-led aesthetic to the previously seamy world of adult toys. That's inspired a generation of sleek gadgets that studiously avoid mimicking anatomical parts, making them inoffensive enough to appeal to mainstream consumers, and even to win shelf-space at retailers such as Wal-Mart and Target. "The category had been isolated by the taboo that surrounded it. I figured, I can transcend that," Imboden says. TheAtlantic.com (5/14) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
Innovation and Creativity 
  • The strange death of Flickr's innovation engine
    Yahoo's acquisition of Flickr can now be seen as the first sign of the groundbreaking photo-sharing service falling into stagnation, writes Mat Honan. Merging with Yahoo forced Flickr to allocate resources to integration rather than innovation, and with nobody at Yahoo willing to stump up more cash for R&D, Flickr began its long slide into irrelevance. "It was a stunning failure in vision," Honan writes. Gizmodo (5/15) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
  • Why Fab.com's founder killed his own company
    Successful innovation means taking big risks -- and nobody knows that better than Fab.com co-founder Bradford Shellhammer. He pulled the plug on his established but stagnating social network, Fabulis, to transform the site into a now-thriving e-commerce hub. "We couldn't fail, that wasn't an option for us. We had already failed, really," he explains in this video. Fast Company online (5/15) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
 
The Global Perspective 
  • "Made in China" is a passing trend
    There's no hard-and-fast rule that says China will always be the world's manufacturing hub, says Gallup CEO Jim Clifton. Chinese companies haven't learned to engage their workers or to add value through entrepreneurship, Clifton argues, meaning their only advantage is their supply of cheap labor. "But that won't last forever," Clifton predicts. "Their wages will keep going up, and jobs will go to other places -- to Southeast Asia, to India, probably some to Africa, maybe some to parts of the Middle East." Gallup Management Journal (free content) (5/15) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
Daily Diversion 
  • The Chinese flap over high-stakes pigeon racing
    Horse racing is banned in mainland China, so sporting types have embraced pigeon racing as the next best thing. Pedigree birds can change hands for hundreds of thousands of dollars, and some racers have been accused of doping their pigeons with steroids or arranging for favored birds to be given a head start by race organizers. "It's not corruption, it's just the market is chaotic," says one aficionado. National Public Radio (text and audio) (5/15) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
 
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SmartQuote 
No one ever started a business because they wanted to give people jobs. They start businesses because they're obsessed with an idea."
--Jim Clifton, CEO of Gallup, as quoted in the Gallup Management Journal
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