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January 28, 2013
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Business Finance Today 
Your Bottom Line 
  • Concerns grow that the corporate-bond market is getting riskier
    Weaker creditworthiness of nonfinancial corporations is prompting concern that corporate credit could tighten, Vincent Ryan writes. A report by Standard & Poor's says downgrades of junk-bond issuers are outpacing upgrades for the first time since 2009. For now, borrowing rates remain low and demand for corporate credit is high, but credit rating agencies are paying closer attention to how the debt proceeds are used. CFO.com (1/25) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
In the C-Suite 
  • Struggling to innovate? Blame your HR team
    Hiring practices can have a big impact on a company's innovation culture, writes Liz Ryan. Needlessly pompous and arbitrarily complex recruitment policies mean many firms' hiring practices reward compliance rather than creativity. "The whole encrusted recruiting process ... makes it easy for organizations to hire drones, and it makes it hard for them to hire the brilliant and complex people they need to solve their problems," Ryan writes. Bloomberg Businessweek/The Management Blog (1/23) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
  • It's time to start taking employee problems seriously
    Some companies refuse to address individuals' "pain points" to avoid setting a potentially costly precedent, writes Laura Vanderkam. That's a false economy, she argues: If your turnover increases or your workers' productivity drops, you'll wind up paying far more than if you'd simply fixed the problems. CBS MoneyWatch (1/23) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
On the Move 
  • Kristina Salen will be CFO of Etsy. She is a portfolio manager at Fidelity. Business Insider (1/24) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
Off the Charts 
  • The history of high heels includes men
    Men wore high heels for centuries, for various reasons. They were originally designed for riding horses, and later they signified a higher social status because they were useless in walking down a cobbled street. BBC (1/24) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
Most Read by CFOs 

Top five news stories selected by SmartBrief for CFOs readers in the past week.

  • Results based on number of times each story was clicked by readers.
SmartQuote 
There's been so much talk that yields this low can't persist, but they have."
--Jesse Fogarty of Cutwater Asset Management, as quoted by CFO.com
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