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December 5, 2012
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  Top Story 
 
  • AAFP outlines efforts to reduce improper opioid use
    The AAFP gives family physicians educational tools and resources to help stop nonprescription use of opioid drugs, the Academy said in a letter to Sen. John Rockefeller, D-W.Va., who asked for information on the group's efforts. The AAFP opposes a bill Rockefeller is sponsoring that would require physicians to have mandatory education before they can prescribe certain drugs, such as opioids. AAFP News Now (12/4) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Clinical News 
  • Statins may increase muscle pain, study shows
    Data from the STOMP trial showed patients who took high-dose atorvastatin for six months did not lose muscle strength but did have higher creatine-kinase levels, which may result in muscle pain. The study, published in the journal Circulation, supports undocumented observations that statins can increase muscle pain, researchers said. Medscape (free registration)/Heartwire (12/4) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Adverse reactions to TMP-SMX are on the rise in children
    Cases of adverse reactions to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole involving pediatric patients rose from five between 2000 and 2004 to 104 from 2005 to 2009, a review showed. More than half of the cases between 2005 and 2009 involved skin and soft tissue infection, University of Missouri researchers reported in the journal Pediatrics. DoctorsLounge.com/HealthDay News (12/3) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Women with sleep apnea have more severe brain damage than men
    Sleep apnea was associated with worse brain damage in women than in male patients, a study in the journal Sleep indicated, and women with the condition displayed more significant signs of depression and anxiety. "This tells us that doctors should consider that the sleep disorder may be more problematic and therefore need earlier treatment in women than men," said researcher Paul Macey. MedicalDaily.com (12/4) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Practice Management 
  • 750 Ind. physicians agree to publish quality data
    The Indiana Health Information Exchange announced that more than 750 of the state's physicians will allow their clinical quality scores to be published online as part of the organization's Quality Health First initiative. "Reporting these quality scores is a significant milestone for physician practices seeking to demonstrate their commitment to improving the quality of care provided to patients," said Harold Apple, IHIE's president and CEO. Modern Healthcare (subscription required) (12/4) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Health Policy & Legislation 
  • Governors urge Obama to loosen strings on Medicaid funds
    Governors meeting with President Barack Obama about avoiding automatic tax increases and spending cuts asked for more flexibility in their management of Medicaid and other federal-state programs. Delaware Gov. Jack Markell, a Democrat, said that his state would have to revisit its plan to expand Medicaid eligibility under the Affordable Care Act if the federal government reduces funding. CBS News (12/4) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
  Professional Issues & Trends 
  • Survey: 22% of internists plan to go into primary care
    A Mayo Clinic study of survey responses from 17,000 physicians in their final year of an internal medicine residency program showed fewer than 22% planned to stay in general internal medicine, while 64% wanted to be a specialist. The study in the Journal of the American Medical Association found women were more likely than men to continue in primary care. Reuters (12/4) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
  Inside the AAFP 
  • Earn AAFP prescribed credit with your subscription to FP Audio
    Enhance your clinical knowledge, earn AAFP Prescribed credit, and prepare for the ABFM board exam all at the same time via your subscription to FP Audio.
    FP Audio is a monthly subscription with each edition containing one hour of content including a clinical topic, SAM Pearls, Journal Notes and Editor's Q&A. Earn up to 24 AAFP Prescribed credits per year. Includes online access to MP3 files and quizzes. The November FP Audio contains information on arterial ischemic ulcers of the lower extremity, common childhood psychiatric and behavioral dilemmas, sinusitis and cold injuries of the extremities. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Take action now for family medicine
    By the end of the year, Congress will attempt to resolve our country’s “fiscal cliff.” Family medicine programs are in jeopardy, and vulnerable patient populations are at risk. Take action now by sending provided letters to Congress insisting they protect primary care. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Learn more about AAFP ->Home Page  |  AAFP News Now  |  AAFP CareerLink  |  AAFP CME Center  |  Connect to the AAFP

  SmartQuote 
The forceps of our minds are clumsy things and crush the truth a little in the course of taking hold of it."
--H.G. Wells,
British author


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About AAFP
This news roundup is provided as a timely update to AAFP members and other health care professionals about family medicine topics in the news media. Links to articles are provided for the convenience of family physicians who may find them of use in discussions with patients or colleagues. Opinions expressed in AAFP SmartBrief are those of the identified authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policies of the American Academy of Family Physicians. On occasion, media articles may include or imply incorrect information about the AAFP and its policies, positions or relationships. For clarification on AAFP positions and policies, we refer you to http://aafp.org.

External Resources are not a part of the AAFP website. AAFP is not responsible for the content of sites that are external to the AAFP. Linking to a website does not constitute an endorsement by AAFP of the sponsors of the site or the information presented on the site.

 
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