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November 26, 2012
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News for special education professionals

  Curriculum & Instruction 
  • Utah elementary offers "sensory breaks"
    Whittier Elementary School in West Valley City, Utah, offers physical therapy and sensory-integration rooms to give students with disabilities "sensory breaks" that school officials say helps them focus on their lessons. The rooms offer a variety of sensory therapies from soft music and disco balls to vibrating mats and climbing walls. "It's unbelievable the amount of focus you can get if you spend just a little bit of a break, a sensory break, where you get varied kinds of stimulation like this," said Noelle Converse, special-education director for Granite School District. The Salt Lake Tribune (Utah) (11/23) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Students with gifts, disabilities sometimes struggle to get help
    Education reporter Jay Mathews writes in this blog post that homework and repetitive assignments are a challenge to complete for students who are gifted and who also have learning disabilities. Parents of such children often struggle to get accommodations for them because their teachers sometimes view these students as "lazy," he notes. Mathews argues that teachers should set aside preconceived ideas and, at least, consider accommodations for these students. The Washington Post/Class Struggle blog (11/24) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Educational Leadership 
  • Programs focusing on students transform Calif. elementary school
    Principal Canen Peterson helped change the reputation of Theodore Judah Elementary in Folsom, Calif., from "the prison school" to one of the highest-performing schools in the area. He created dozens of programs, including an academically accelerated program, a mentor program bringing in adults from the community and 13 after-school clubs and enrichment programs open to all students. "For the first time in a long time, we don't have students leaving," Peterson said. The Sacramento Bee (Calif.) (free registration) (11/24) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Hot Topics 

Top five news stories selected by CEC SmartBrief readers in the past week.

  • Results based on number of times each story was clicked by readers.
  Technology Trends 
  • Utah teen with autism connects with online charter school
    Susan Harms, whose 15-year-old son, David, has autism and fetal alcohol syndrome, believes the Utah Virtual Academy K-12 program has helped her son progress further than any traditional campus he has attended. The teen is attracted to technology and uses the computer and his smartphone to complete assignments. The online charter school organizes the teenager's speech and occupational therapy sessions and individual education program meetings. The Salt Lake Tribune (Utah) (11/23) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Policy News 
  • Wash. district creates data system to find at-risk students early
    Spokane Public Schools in Washington has developed its own data-analysis system. Called the Early Warning System, it uses students' attendance, discipline referrals and assessment scores to identify students, as early as elementary school, who are at risk for dropping out. Once students are flagged, teachers can use the data to offer appropriate interventions, such as extra assistance in reading or math, to help bring students' skills up to grade level. The Spokesman-Review (Spokane, Wash.) (free content) (11/23) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
  Eye on Exceptionalities 
  • Therapy may help some with Tourette's control tics
    Valsa Eapen, a researcher at the University of New South Wales and the Ingham Institute, says cognitive-behavior therapy could help people with Tourette's syndrome control their tics by recognizing the urge and then doing some other movement. She presented her research on the therapy at the Australasian Society for Psychophysiology conference. Her research also includes identifying the five genes that cause Tourette's syndrome, which also are linked to other developmental disorders such as autism and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. The Sydney Morning Herald (Australia) (11/24) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
The Buzz(CORPORATE ANNOUNCEMENTS)

Math Tools in Action is an exciting new DVD series that shows teachers in grades 1-5 how to use anchor charts, journals, and manipulatives to deepen and improve math instruction. Each DVD chronicles a complete lesson in a real classroom, with expert commentary and teaching tips before and during the lesson. Click here to view clips and download the viewing guides!

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    Insightful and pioneering research, topical issues and broad perspectives by leaders in the field for more than 75 years have made "Exceptional Children" (EC) the most respected scholarly journal in special and gifted education. This peer-reviewed journal publishes research, research reviews, methodological reviews of literature, data-based position papers and policy analyses on the education and development of children and youth with exceptionalities. Subscribe now! LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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Position TitleCompany NameLocation
Curriculum, Instruction and Assessment Coordinator (CIA Coordinator)Sheppard Pratth's Therapeutic Preschool ProgramTowson, MD
Inclusive Early Childhood (IEC) Program CoordinatorBowling Green State UniversityBowling Green, OH
Assistant Superintendent, Student Learning & PartnershipsOregon Department of EducationSalem, OR
Professor/Director, Center for Research on LearningUniversity of KansasLawrence, KS
Director of Student ServicesHYA Executive Search US - IL - Maywood
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  SmartQuote 
The most exhausting thing in life is being insincere."
--Anne Morrow Lindbergh,
American author and aviator


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