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January 15, 2013
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News for professionals focused on the health of women and newborns

  Women's Health Update 
 
  • Study: Pap smears might find ovarian and uterine cancer
    Cervical fluid collected for Pap smear tests may also contain traces of ovary or endometrium cells, indicating that the test used to detect cervical cancer could also help find ovarian and uterine cancer, according to a study published in the journal Science Translational Medicine. Researchers stress that though the findings indicate a positive first step in being able to identify ovarian and uterine cancer, larger-scale studies need to be conducted to examine the test's reliability. MyHealthNewsDaily.com (1/9) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • CDC: Binge drinking is an under-recognized health issue for women
    Binge drinking remains an under-recognized women's health problem, despite being linked to serious health issues and the deaths of about 12,000 U.S. women and girls per year, the CDC said on Tuesday. Researchers assessed drinking behaviors of about 278,000 women ages 18 and older, and 7,500 high-school girls in 2011, and found that 1 in 8 women and 1 in 5 high-school girls reported binge drinking. Reuters (1/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Obstetrics Focus 
 
  • Reducing C-sections may lead to $5B in savings, report finds
    The average cost of birth via cesarean section is 50% higher than the cost of natural delivery, according to a new report, and 33% of U.S. babies are born via C-section. Reducing the rates of C-sections to meet World Health Organization recommendations could save $5 billion in the cost of maternity care, researchers said. BeckersHospitalReview.com (1/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Gestational diabetes associated with higher medical costs
    Women who had gestational diabetes were more likely to deliver via cesarean section, and their babies were more likely to require admission to the neonatal unit, resulting in costs that were about 34% greater than for women without gestational diabetes, according to a study in Diabetes Care. Measures to help prevent gestational diabetes may offer clinical benefits while cutting costs, researchers said. DailyRx.com (1/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  AWHONN Spotlight on Research 
  • Expectant fathers' distress linked to emotional problems in children
    Babies born to expectant fathers who are depressed or anxious are more likely to have emotional problems by the time they reach preschool age, according to a new Norwegian study of more than 30,000 children. The findings, say the authors, could provide new intervention opportunities for at-risk children during pregnancy. The results were reported online in Pediatrics and are based on surveys of expectant fathers and subsequent parent reports of behavioral difficulties, emotional difficulties and social functioning of their children at 36 months. Previous studies have linked fathers' mental distress during the postnatal period with behavioral and emotional problems in their children, but this is among the first to establish a connection during pregnancy. The authors hypothesize that the link could be caused by genetics; the indirect impact of the father's psychological distress on his pregnant partner, which could affect the baby; and/or the possibility that a father's prenatal mental health predicts his mental health in the postnatal period. Read the abstract. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Get Creative: 10 Ways to Think Outside the Box
No matter your business, smart solutions come from out-of-the-box thinking. We all know creativity is king, but are you doing all you can to inspire and encourage creativity in your staff? Read the article and learn 10 ways to inspire creativity at your office.

  Neonatal Health 
  • High white blood cell a sign of pertussis severity in babies
    Health records of 31 babies with pertussis in intensive care in California between 2009 and 2011 revealed at least a 50% increase in white blood cells among nearly all of those with more severe pertussis. Aside from having elevated maximum heart and breathing rates, researchers found that babies with more serious pertussis were at greater risk for pneumonia, seizures, shock and kidney failure. The findings appear in the Journal of the Pediatric Infectious Diseases Society. HealthDay News (1/10) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Study suggests intestinal bacteria may play role in colic
    Babies with colic develop certain gut bacteria later than those without colic, and researchers in the Netherlands said the crying that accompanies the condition may occur because infants lacking those species suffer more pain and inflammation. While researchers suggested the findings could lead to early colic screenings and interventions, other experts stressed that it is too soon to recommend probiotics for parents of new babies, particularly because probiotics can sometimes have harmful effects. HealthDay News (1/14) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Maternal obesity may predispose babies to lower vitamin D levels
    Babies born to obese mothers showed lower levels of vitamin D compared with those born to mothers with a healthier weight, a study in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism indicated. "What was novel about this study was that we found babies born with higher vitamin D levels had more body fat. That's in contrast to studies in children and adults who have an inverse relationship between levels of vitamin D and body fat, where the higher their vitamin D, the lower their fat," said study author Dr. Jami L. Josefson. Yahoo/Asian News International (1/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  AWHONN News 
  • Doctors pushed to identify domestic violence victims under ACA
    New Affordable Care Act provisions will make identifying signs of domestic violence as routine as getting a mammogram or Pap smear, according to a recent journal article. With preventive screenings such as mammograms prioritized in the 2010 health reform law, doctors are now encouraged to ask specific questions of females ages 12 and older to find signs of intimate partner violence and make referrals for professional counseling, according to a Nov. 29 article in the New England Journal of Medicine authored by two Boston University researchers. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Offer yourself as a resource to elected officials
    Earlier this month, the 113th Congress gathered in Washington, D.C., to begin its work. Consider writing to your representative and senators to congratulate them on their recent election victories and to offer yourself as a resource on important health policy topics. AWHONN has created template letters to send to your representative and senators. Please customize these letters and fax or e-mail them to your elected officials in early 2013. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  SmartQuote 
If any man will draw up his case, and put his name at the foot of the first page, I will give him an immediate reply. Where he compels me to turn over the sheet, he must wait my leisure."
--John Montagu,
British statesman


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Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

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