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November 13, 2012
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News for Professionals in the Orthotics, Prosthetics and Pedorthics Profession

  Top Story 
  • Premier calls device ID rule the "missing link" to patient safety
    The FDA's proposal to create a unique device identifier system to electronically track medical technologies has earned support from the Premier Healthcare Alliance, which said it will enhance adverse event reporting and make product recalls faster and more accurate. The move also could save the industry about $16 billion a year due to increased efficiencies, the group said in a comment letter to FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg. Healthcare Informatics online (11/2) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • For more:   Read AOPA's comment letter to the FDA concerning the unique device identification system proposed rule. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Medical News 
  • Diabetic men need more aggressive foot treatment, study says
    A study published in the journal Endocrine found that male gender was a predictive factor for diabetic foot complications, including ulcers and amputation. Men had poorer wound care than women, a difference researchers attributed to men being "more commonly involved in heavy physical work activities and deal[ing] with more social pressure to keep providing the family income." Ulceration and amputation were both significantly more common among men than among women in the study, which looked at records of 496 patients. News-Medical.Net/medwireNews (11/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Islet cell transplants could lead to diabetes cure
    Dr. Camillo Ricordi is working with other scientists at the University of Miami's Diabetes Research Institute on transplanting islet cells into patients with type 1 diabetes. Half of those treated were able to stay off insulin for five years, comparable with patients who received pancreas transplants. Researchers are working on ways, such as encapsulation, to make the transplanted cells survive longer and minimize use of antirejection drugs. The Miami Herald(free registration) (11/10) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Israeli medical center prevents amputations with leg catheterization
    Doctors at Rambam Medical Center in Haifa, Israel, announced that they have prevented foot amputations in 521 diabetic patients over the past two years by performing catheterizations to improve blood flow to affected limbs. Previously, Israelis underwent about 1,000 amputations each year as the result of type 2 diabetes. The Jerusalem Post(free registration) (11/12) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Diabetes association seeks treatment approaches for the elderly
    In an effort to address the prevalence of diabetes in the elderly -- more than 25% of adults 65 and older have the disease -- the American Diabetes Association convened a group of experts that is expected to release a report later this year. Older diabetic patients are typically left out of clinical research, according to committee member Dr. Hermes Florez, because drug companies want to avoid complications. "With life expectancy being five to 10 years more than before and the increased prevalence of this disease, we have to prepare ourselves," he said. The Miami Herald(free registration) (11/10) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Science and Technology 
  • Self-healing material may find application in prosthetics
    Scientists at Stanford University created a material that can sense pressure and heal itself from cuts, burns and tears. The U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research, which provided partial funding for the project, hopes to use the material in prosthetics, where it could quickly heal exterior damage to artificial limbs. An article about the invention was published in the journal Nature Nanotechnology. ABC News/Science blog (11/12) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Rocket-like fuel powers new ankle prosthesis
    Researchers have developed an ankle prosthesis that is powered by a rocket-like monopropellant fuel and uses a "sleeve muscle actuator" that is smaller, yet more powerful, than a comparable electric motor. The technology may lead to externally powered prostheses that do not require large, heavy batteries. MedGadget.com (11/9) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Legislative and Regulatory 
  • HIT policy group requests comments on stage 3 MU proposals
    The Health IT Policy Committee is set to issue a request for public comments on its suggestions for the proposed meaningful use standard for the final stage of the EHR system incentive payment initiative. The group also seeks feedback on how to integrate consumer-reported information into clinical quality measures, which have been a component of MU specifications since the launch of the incentive program. Modern Healthcare (subscription required) (11/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Business and Finance 
  • Advice for paying quarterly estimated taxes
    Even part-time business owners might be required to pay quarterly estimated taxes. Entrepreneurs with gross income of less than $150,000 can avoid penalties by submitting payments equal to the previous year's, according to New York tax attorney Julian Block. "Even if you fail to calculate how high your income is going to be, if you pay in a certain amount, you are assured you won't be subject to any penalties," he explains. Intuit Small Business Blog (11/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • What not to do with company credit cards
    Small-business owners can make the most of credit cards by steering clear of common mistakes such as neglecting to hunt for the best deals on rewards and interest rates before deciding which card to get, Deanne Katz writes. Many cardholders also fail to read the fine print on penalties or max out cards constantly and create a bad credit-to-debt ratio that might deter lenders, she warns. FindLaw/Free Enterprise blog (11/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  AOPA News 
  • Breaking news from AOPA
    Access the latest breaking news and top stories from AOPA, including legislative and regulatory news, what's happening with CMS, the Department of Veterans Affairs, health care reform, the National Assembly, and general information the O&P profession needs to know to keep current and provide the best patient care. Read the breaking news. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Learn more about AOPA ->AOPA Homepage  |  Regulatory News  |  National Assembly  |  Education Calendar
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  SmartQuote 
For the happiest life, rigorously plan your days, leave your nights open to chance."
--Mignon McLaughlin,
American author and journalist


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