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March 7, 2013
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  Policy Watch 
  • House panel hears testimony on H-1B visas
    A hearing this week by the House Judiciary Committee's immigration subpanel featured statements by lawmakers and experts who were critical of H1-B visas. Former congressman Bruce Morrison, testifying on behalf of IEEE-USA, said immigration reform measures should focus on green cards. Several lawmakers defended H-1B visas, arguing that they are typically approved quicker, and therefore enable technology firms to hire quicker. The Hill/Hillicon Valley blog (3/5) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Study: H-1B workers often less qualified than U.S. peers:   Electrical engineers and IT professionals with H-1B visas on average have fewer degrees and receive lower pay than American counterparts, according to a study conducted by Norman Matloff, a computer science professor at the University of California, Davis. InformationWeek (3/4) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • White House supports letting consumers unlock mobile devices
    The White House says it agrees with an online petition calling for broad unlocking of smartphones and tablet computers, and will refer the proposal to the Federal Communications Commission and the National Telecommunications & Information Administration. "If you have paid for your mobile device, and aren't bound by a service agreement or other obligation, you should be able to use it on another network. It's common sense," presidential adviser R. David Edelman wrote in a blog post. Bloomberg (3/4) , Reuters (3/4) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Technology Trends 
  • Analysis: Federal budget cuts threaten tech innovation
    Federal budget cuts may have a long-term effect on technological and scientific innovations, and there is little hope that such research and development will come from the private sector, Bernhard Warner writes. "The government funds primarily basic research. This is where radical innovation and fundamental scientific breakthroughs happen. It's where, say, the next Internet would come from," said Vladimir López-Bassols of the Organization for Economic Cooperation & Development. Bloomberg Businessweek (3/5) , PBS/The Rundown blog (3/5) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • IEEE supports sharing of spectrum between DOD, wireless operators
    The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers is polishing up its IEEE 802.22 wireless communications standard to allow wireless network operators to share the 3550 to 3650 MHz band with U.S. military users. Wireless beacons would enable American ships to continue using that frequency band and allow operators to use the frequencies when ships are not sending transmissions, according to the IEEE. Telecompetitor.com (3/4) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
  Career & Workforce Development 
  • Hiring, retaining IT workers a big worry for health care vendors
    Federal regulators are pushing health care firms to adopt electronic health systems, leading many hospitals to worry about hiring workers who can help implement these systems, indicates a survey by Healthcare Information and Management Systems. Tech skill hiring beat out concerns about cost, product availability and user buy-in, and more than half of respondents expect to boost IT staff in the upcoming year. Computerworld (3/4) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  SmartQuote 
Scientific progress makes moral progress a necessity; for if man's power is increased, the checks that restrain him from abusing it must be strengthened."
--Anne Louise Germaine de Staël,
Swiss author


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