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January 31, 2013
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News about cardiovascular disease prevention and management

  Heart Health News 
  • Report calls for U.S. to move toward preventive health model
    The nonprofit Trust for America's Health proposed shifting U.S. health care from a sick-care model to a prevention format, which economists argued may be a good thing but will not reduce health care costs. Some preventive measures do save money, though, including counseling adults about taking low-dose aspirin to prevent cardiovascular disease, which is much less expensive than the cost of treating heart disease. Reuters (1/29) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Control of LDL and BP matter for diabetes patients, study shows
    Patients with diabetes were 2.5 times less likely to be hospitalized due to cardiovascular disease when glycosylated hemoglobin, systolic blood pressure and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were under control, according to a study from the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research. The report in the Journal of General Internal Medicine found the biggest benefit came from controlling blood pressure and cholesterol. The observational study included more than 26,000 people. Medscape (free registration) (1/30) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Researchers debunk common weight-loss assumptions
    Many common weight-loss beliefs -- including making small dietary changes for consistent weight loss, having realistic goals and using breast-feeding to prevent obesity -- do not show enough evidence to be presented as facts, researchers reported in the New England Journal of Medicine. The study also found a lack of evidence to support ideas associated with eating breakfast, consuming fruits and vegetables, yo-yo dieting and snacking. HealthDay News (1/30) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Study links snoring with early signs of cardiovascular disease
    Snorers without sleep apnea had thicker carotid arteries than nonsnorers, according to a small study to be presented at a meeting of the Triological Society. Carotid arterial thickness among snorers in the study was comparable to that of people who smoke or those who have diabetes or hypertension. "Our study adds to the growing body of evidence suggesting that isolated snoring may not be as benign as first suspected," lead study author Dr. Robert Deeb said. MedicalDaily.com (1/24), Newstrack India/Asian News International (1/25) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
10 ways to inspire creativity in your staff.
Fostering creative business practices isn't as hard as it seems and can lead to smart solutions. Use these ten techniques to help inspire and encourage creativity in your staff. Read the article and learn 10 ways to get the creative juices flowing.

  Emerging Trends 
  • AHA, ACCF boost care with EHR data elements, cardiology definitions
    A set of standard definitions for cardiology and EHR data elements was recently developed by the American College of Cardiology Foundation and American Heart Association to boost communication among health care professionals. "We hope that these data definitions can advance research and clinical care, to increase the adoption of both proven old therapies and new innovations in cardiology," said Dr. Christopher Cannon, a cardiologist at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and chairman of the writing committee. Modern Healthcare (subscription required) (1/28) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
  Nursing in the News 
  • Go Red For Women campaign starts with National Wear Red Day
    Friday begins American Heart Month and is the American Heart Association's annual National Wear Red Day, part of the Go Red For Women campaign. Erica Ross of Atlanta's Go Red for Women project said heart disease still is the No. 1 killer among women, so the Go Red movement's goal is to spread awareness about women and heart disease, promote research and close the gap between survival rates for men and women. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution (1/28), KHOU-TV (Houston) (1/29) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  PCNA Update 
  • New webinar: Healthy lifestyle change
    Making and sustaining changes in dietary habits, physical activity levels and smoking cessation are integral components of reducing cardiovascular disease risk, specifically in reaching target blood pressure, weight, and lipid goals. Join us on Feb. 27 for an important web-based presentation which will explore common challenges, practical solutions, and a new collection of simple tools and resources to support your work and your patients' efforts. Register. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Lead Quote 
All happiness depends on a leisurely breakfast."
--John Gunther,
American author and journalist


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