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January 2, 2013
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News for aviation security professionals

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Sea-Tac Airport Soft Play Area Improves Overall Passenger Experience Long before today's rush to serve families better, Sea-Tac Airport installed a soft play area. "They recreated familiar icons from around the airport," says David O'Niones, PLAYTIME VP of Sales. "Kids recognize the terminals and towers inside the play area that they saw when they drove up." (More)
  Security Update 
  Trends & Technology 
  • Added fees are expected to increase travel costs in 2013
    Travel-service providers such as hotels, cruise lines and rental car agencies are expected to emulate airline practices and introduce more ancillary fees this year. Some hotels are already charging extra for services such as luggage storage and room safes. USA Today (1/1) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Airport Ops Spotlight 
  • At Orlando, Fla., airport, translators are traveling gold
    Dressed in gold vests, 16 members of the Orlando International Airport's ambassador program seek out travelers who may need translation assistance upon their arrival in Florida. The ambassadors speak 11 languages in addition to English and are dispatched to certain areas when planes from different nations arrive. Orlando Sentinel (Fla.) (1/1) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Policy & Regulatory 
  • Michael Huerta is confirmed as FAA chief
    The Senate has confirmed Michael Huerta, the acting administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, as the chief of the agency. Huerta began his tenure as acting administrator in 2011 after Randy Babbitt's departure. Huerta, whose nomination had been blocked for several months by then-Sen. Jim DeMint, R-S.C., will serve a five-year term. Politico (Washington, D.C.)/On Congress blog (1/1) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • FAA to inspect older Boeing 737 jets for cracks
    The Federal Aviation Administration is requiring more stringent inspections for cracks in the tops of 109 Boeing 737 planes. The 737-300, -400 and -500 models will be subjected to the evaluations, which are estimated to cost $5.2 million. The move comes after a 2009 incident when a Southwest flight made an emergency landing when a hole appeared in the roof. SeattlePI.com/The Associated Press (12/31) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Position TitleCompany NameLocation
Director (Chief), Public Safety, Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority (MNAA)Metropolitan Nashville Airport Authority (MNAA)US - Nashville, TN
MANAGER, DIVISION OF UTILITIES - PROGRAM MANAGER IVMARYLAND AVIATION ADMINISTRATIONUS - BALTIMORE WASHINGTON INTERNATIONAL THURGOOD MARSHALL AIRPORT
Civil EngineerMetropolitan Washington Airports AuthorityWashington, DC
Director ofHuman ResourcesReno-Tahoe Airport AuthorityReno, NV
Airport Operations ManagerCity of Battle CreekBattle Creek, MI
Project Director - Senior Airport ArchitectHillsborough County Aviation AuthorityTampa, FL
FirefighterFlathead Municipal Airport AuthorityKalispell, MT
Airport Operations AgentCity of Kansas City, Missouri Aviation DepartmentKansas City, MO
Click here to view more job listings.

  SmartQuote 
Birds sing after a storm; why shouldn't people feel as free to delight in whatever remains to them."
--Rose Kennedy,
American philanthropist


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