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November 21, 2012
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Working to create positive images of girls and women in media and entertainment

  Gender In Media 
  • Healthy MEdia: Change needed to promote positive female imagery
    The latest Healthy MEdia Commission for Positive Images of Women and Girls report outlines steps to improve the portrayal of women and girls in the media. In addition to calling on media industry leaders to pick "girl-specific healthy topics," the report calls on families to create agreement guidelines covering what children watch, and on educators to bring media literacy into their classrooms. The Tennessean (Nashville) (tiered subscription model) (11/15) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Childhood aspirations said to reinforce gender gap
    Females' top professional aspirations as children point to the existence of a gender achievement gap at very young ages, according to new research from LinkedIn. Where men reported professional athlete, pilot and scientist as their top picks when they were young, women's top job picks were teacher, veterinarian and writer. Forbes (11/15) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Davis: Time to improve media portrayals of females
    There has been little improvement in the way women are portrayed in the media over the last two decades, but improved awareness and the use of tools like social media can help change the status quo, Academy Award-winning actor Geena Davis tells Ms. Magazine in this interview. "I'm very optimistic about social media. It democratizes things, so there's nothing to prevent women from expressing themselves and making themselves heard. Change can just happen so fast these days with the way technology moves," Davis says. Ms. Magazine/Ms. blog (11/16) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Trends & Insights 
  • Young girls gravitate toward boy brands, study finds
    Young girls are increasingly into boy-focused brands, such as Lego, and are immune to efforts by parents to steer them away, according to the latest Young Love study by research firm Smarty Pants. The annual study looks at the attitudes of 6- to 12-year-olds and their parents toward 250 brands. KidScreen (11/16) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Basu: Little change in roles for women in Bollywood
    Audiences should not expect to see major change in Bollywood movies away from a focus on heroes despite some recent high-profile movies with female protagonists, warns actor Bipasha Basu. "There are now some intelligent filmmakers, who are making films which are thankfully not about being feminists but about making entertaining films. As an actor, you have to really hunt for these films!" Basu says. The Express Tribune (Pakistan)/IANS (11/19) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Ideas in Action 
  • "Sexy Baby" examines sexualization of young girls in the media
      
    Source: Access Hollywood
    The "Sexy Baby" documentary takes a closer look at how the Internet age is perpetuating negative images of females, in particularly young girls. The film highlights the perspective of kids in middle school. "I think we are in the middle of a bad trend, which is this over sexualization of female characters, female images that kids see," Geena Davis told "Access Hollywood." Access Hollywood (11/20) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story

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  SmartQuote 
Wisdom is not acquired save as the result of investigation."
--Sara Teasdale,
American poet


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About Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media
Six years ago, while watching children's entertainment with her young daughter, Academy Award winner Geena Davis noticed a remarkable imbalance in the ratio of male to female characters. From that small starting point, Davis commissioned the largest research study ever undertaken on gender in children's entertainment. The research showed that in the top-grossing G-rated films, there were three male characters for every one female - a statistic that still has not improved. The Institute is the leading resource for gender in media research, trends and education for the entertainment industry and the public. The Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and See Jane are a project of Community Partners.
 
About See Jane
See Jane is a program of the Institute that utilizes research, education and advocacy to engage the entertainment industry and recognize the need for gender balance and varied portrayals of females and male characters into movies, TV, and other media aimed at children 11 and under. We work cooperatively and collaboratively with entertainment creators to encourage them to be leaders in creating positive change.
 
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