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February 14, 2013
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News about cardiovascular disease prevention and management

  Heart Health News 
  • Minn. town's heart health project makes a difference
    Halfway through a 10-year "Heart of New Ulm" project to improve the Minnesota community's cardiovascular health, data show lower rates of high blood pressure and cholesterol, a stable obesity rate, and a small drop in weight across the population. The project has broad community support, and data is tracked using electronic medical records at New Ulm Medical Center, where more than 90% of the 13,000 residents get their health care. Star Tribune (Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minn.) (2/10) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Researchers: Salt study shows importance of public interventions
    A 4% yearly reduction in sodium intake in the U.S., to achieve a daily level of 2,200 milligrams within 10 years, could save up to a half-million lives, according to research from the University of California at San Francisco. The study in the journal Hypertension lists several options for lowering sodium intake, but researchers said a gradual reduction could be accomplished through changes to prepared and processed foods. They said the potential health benefit "suggests that sodium reduction is an important target for public health interventions." MedPage Today (free registration) (2/12) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • High calcium intake may add to women's risk of cardiac death
    Daily dietary intake or supplementation of more than 1,400 milligrams of calcium was linked to an almost twofold increased risk of dying from heart problems, Swedish researchers reported in the journal BMJ. They noted that women whose calcium intake was less than 600 milligrams also appeared to be at increased risk. HealthDay News (2/12) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
  Emerging Trends 
  • High BP during pregnancy may mean higher risk later in life
    High blood pressure during pregnancy means a greater risk of heart disease, kidney problems and diabetes later in life, even with only one or two high blood pressure readings, according to a study in the journal Circulation. Women whose blood pressure returned to normal after pregnancy were still 1.6 to 2.5 times more likely to develop subsequent high blood pressure requiring hospitalization or treatment. HealthDay News (2/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Aspirin plus clopidogrel lowers risk of stroke recurrence
    Researchers tracked 5,170 minor stroke or transient ischemic attack survivors in China and found that those who received aspirin and clopidogrel were 32% less likely to suffer a second stroke in 90 days than those who took aspirin alone. The two groups both had comparably low rates of intracerebral bleeding, death and myocardial infarction. The study was presented at the International Stroke Conference. MedPage Today (free registration) (2/10) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 
  Nursing in the News 
  • N.Y. heart hospital is recognized for using nursing quality data
    The ANA honored the six recipients of the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators Award for Outstanding Nursing Quality, including St. Francis Hospital -- The Heart Center in Roslyn, N.Y. Of the more than 1,900 hospitals considered for the award, six "demonstrated superior results and sustained improvement in patient outcomes that are tied to the quality of nursing services and nurse work environment factors," the group said. Nurse.com (2/7) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  PCNA Update 
  • Win $5,000 to fund your organization's wellness program
    PCNA is challenging hospitals and organizations to spread awareness about heart disease prevention by hosting a Prevention Challenge for your employees or members. Participating organizations have the option to submit your Prevention Challenge to PCNA for a chance to win a $5,000 award to fund your healthy lifestyle or wellness program. Learn more. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • New webinar: Healthy lifestyle change
    Making and sustaining changes in dietary habits, physical activity levels and smoking cessation are integral components of reducing cardiovascular disease risk, specifically in reaching target blood pressure, weight, and lipid goals. Join us on Feb. 27 for an important web-based presentation which will explore common challenges, practical solutions, and a new collection of simple tools and resources to support your work and your patients' efforts. Register. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Lead Quote 
Continuity gives us roots; change gives us branches, letting us stretch and grow and reach new heights."
--Pauline Kezer,
American politician


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