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December 6, 2012
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Working to create positive images of girls and women in media and entertainment

  Gender In Media 

  • Fluke calls on Hollywood to help girls "imagine" what's possible
    Sandra Fluke, during her keynote address at The Hollywood Reporter's 21st annual Women in Entertainment breakfast, discussed the importance of young girls and boys seeing females in strong leadership roles both in the media and out. Young girls and boys "must grow up seeing equal representations of girls and boys in media so that they don't regard those as girly shows, but more importantly, so that they too can imagine women being the leaders of the future and the next generation," Fluke said. The Hollywood Reporter (12/5) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Half of Sundance festival entries directed by women
    Half of the entries in this year's Sundance Film Festival competition are directed by women, a first for the independent film gathering. Stacie Passon's "Concussion," Jill Soloway’s "Afternoon Delight" and Lake Bell's "In A World" are among the female-driven films competing. USA Today (11/28) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Trends & Insights 
  • UC-Davis study: Men still dominate top posts in Calif. companies
    Women hold only 10% of the top management positions and directorships in 400 of California's largest corporations, writes Steve Currall, dean of the Graduate School of Management at the University of California-Davis. "It's vital that we have that diversity of thought and experience in the leadership of these companies. More and more research is examining the possibility that having more women in top management and on boards actually improves company performance," he asserts. The Huffington Post/The Blog (12/5) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Ideas in Action 
  • Davis aims to raise recognition of gender portrayals in media
    The lack of recognition among audiences and media producers alike about the severely skewed ratio of male to female characters in television and movies is what inspires Academy Award-winning actor Geena Davis to work for better representation of females, she says in this interview. “There's just so few female characters that have positions of authority, that are playing the important politicians, business leaders, law partners. That's what we want to work on because if kids don't see it, they're not going to think of wanting to become that when they grow up,” according to Davis. KCET-TV (Los Angeles) (12/4) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Toy company helps girls discover a love of engineering
    There weren't many other women in Debbie Sterling's engineering courses while she was attending Stanford University, and the lack of gender parity in technical fields eventually led her to start a toy company called GoldieBlox. "I'm creating a toy company that teaches little girls what engineering is, making it fun and accessible the way Lego and Erector sets have done for boys for over 100 years," she said. Her company's first product was funded on Kickstarter and is due to ship early next year. TheDailyMuse.com (12/2) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  SmartQuote 
It is astonishing what force, purity and wisdom it requires for a human being to keep clear of falsehoods."
--Margaret Fuller,
American journalist and women's rights activist


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About Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media
Six years ago, while watching children's entertainment with her young daughter, Academy Award winner Geena Davis noticed a remarkable imbalance in the ratio of male to female characters. From that small starting point, Davis commissioned the largest research study ever undertaken on gender in children's entertainment. The research showed that in the top-grossing G-rated films, there were three male characters for every one female - a statistic that still has not improved. The Institute is the leading resource for gender in media research, trends and education for the entertainment industry and the public. The Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and See Jane are a project of Community Partners.
 
About See Jane
See Jane is a program of the Institute that utilizes research, education and advocacy to engage the entertainment industry and recognize the need for gender balance and varied portrayals of females and male characters into movies, TV, and other media aimed at children 11 and under. We work cooperatively and collaboratively with entertainment creators to encourage them to be leaders in creating positive change.
 
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Madeline Di Nonno
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