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December 27, 2012
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Working to create positive images of girls and women in media and entertainment

  Gender In Media 
  • Other News
  Trends & Insights 
  • Women who rose to the top in 2012
    It has been a year of ups and downs for female business leaders, Colleen Leahey writes. Among 2012's big winners: Marissa Mayer, who took over as CEO of Yahoo; Marillyn Hewson, who unexpectedly landed the top job at Lockheed Martin; Phebe Novakovic, who runs General Dynamics; and IBM CEO Ginni Rometty, who now also serves as Big Blue's chairwoman and president. CNNMoney/Fortune (12/26) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • What's really behind gender imbalance in the business world
    Women tend to talk about what women can do to address gender imbalances in the business world, but business leaders understand that the disparity is more about policies and management practices, writes Avivah Wittenberg-Cox, CEO of 20-first. "Every women's network, every additional dollar spent in coaching and mentoring women, every women's conference, is just another way of avoiding the real issues and adding another whip to blame the ladies," she writes. "And as soon as you suggest this to the guys who run the place, they ruefully admit it's true." Harvard Business Review online/HBR Blog Network (12/12) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • More women are tackling home-repair projects
    Women are increasingly taking on home-repair projects, including physically demanding tasks such as repairing roofs and finishing basements. The trend is being driven by demographic shifts such as the increasing number of single women buying homes, this article says. "If men can quilt and take over the kitchen, then women can pick up a wrench and fix a leaky pipe," said Hanna Rosin, co-founder of Slate's Double X blog. The Washington Post (12/18) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
  Ideas in Action 
  • Pilot-turned-designer creates watches especially for female fliers
    Chelsea Abingdon Welch always wanted a career in aviation, but the 28-year-old pilot didn't expect it to include watch design. Then she discovered a hole in the market where watches for women should be. "You could buy a man's watch, but it was bulky and black or brown, and you know a man's watch," Welch said. "A bunch of women got together and we did the first two designs, which were the Jackie model and the Amelia model." The watches include all the features a pilot needs in the cockpit -- Zulu time, a stopwatch and an E-6B slide rule -- but with a design that is decidedly feminine. General Aviation News (12/19) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
  Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media News 
  • Davis: Gender disparity in the media often goes unnoticed
    Academy Award-winning actor Geena Davis recently visited St. Louis, where she spoke at an event sponsored by the Women's Foundation of Greater St. Louis. During the trip, Davis called attention to the lack of female characters in TV and movies, and noted that few people notice the disparity. "We all assume that items aimed at kids are good for them, that somebody has put thought into it, but the issue is that most people haven't,” Davis said. St. Louis Post-Dispatch (12/25) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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About Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media
Six years ago, while watching children's entertainment with her young daughter, Academy Award winner Geena Davis noticed a remarkable imbalance in the ratio of male to female characters. From that small starting point, Davis commissioned the largest research study ever undertaken on gender in children's entertainment. The research showed that in the top-grossing G-rated films, there were three male characters for every one female - a statistic that still has not improved. The Institute is the leading resource for gender in media research, trends and education for the entertainment industry and the public. The Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and See Jane are a project of Community Partners.
 
About See Jane
See Jane is a program of the Institute that utilizes research, education and advocacy to engage the entertainment industry and recognize the need for gender balance and varied portrayals of females and male characters into movies, TV, and other media aimed at children 11 and under. We work cooperatively and collaboratively with entertainment creators to encourage them to be leaders in creating positive change.
 
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