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February 7, 2013
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  Top Story 
  • Report calls primary care the foundation of U.S. health care system
    The shortage of primary care physicians means more patients are not getting needed care or are using hospital emergency departments for non-emergency visits, according to a report issued by Sen. Bernard Sanders, I-Vt., chairman of the Senate Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Subcommittee on Primary Health and Aging. The report said primary care leads to better patient outcomes, reduces disparities and spending and "is intended to be, and should be, the foundation of the U.S. health care system." AAFP News Now (2/6) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Clinical News 
  • Guidelines call for more aggressive approach to diabetes care for children
    The American Academy of Pediatrics, in consultation with the AAFP and other groups, released new guidelines for managing type 2 diabetes in newly diagnosed children and adolescents. The guidelines call for insulin as the first-line treatment in a subset of these patients. The Academy is reviewing the guidelines for possible endorsement, and Stephen Spann, M.D., the AAFP's liaison to the guidelines committee, said, "This is an evidence-based guideline that provides broad and in-depth advice to primary care physicians providing care to these patients, advocating for a team-based approach to care." AAFP News Now (2/6) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Pertactin-negative Bordetella pertussis emerges in U.S
    U.S. researchers analyzed 12 Bordetella pertussis isolates collected from children hospitalized in Philadelphia and found that 11 of them tested negative for pertactin. Another study showed that children who received diphtheria-tetanus-whole-cell pertussis priming had lower incidence of pertussis than other children. Both studies were published in the New England Journal of Medicine. News (2/6) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Diabetes patients might benefit most from Mediterranean diet
    The Mediterranean diet was associated with a mean weight loss of 4 pounds at six months in adults with type 2 diabetes, while other diet plans studied did not yield similar results, according to an analysis of 20 studies comparing seven popular diets in diabetes patients. Researchers also noted a 4% to 10% increase in good cholesterol and a reduction of as much as 9% in triglycerides in patients who were on the Mediterranean, low-carb or low-glycemic diet. The results appear in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition. Reuters (2/6) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • FDA issues warning against deceptive flu products
    The FDA has released a report warning the public against fraudulent flu products that carry unproven claims about curing, treating or preventing the flu. The warning covers drugs, nasal sprays, devices, foods and dietary supplements. The FDA said it has yet to approve any over-the-counter treatment that can cure or prevent the condition, and there are no approved generic formulations of Tamiflu or Relenza. News (2/5) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Practice Management 
  • Solo practices find ways to ensure financial stability
    Missouri primary care physician Craig Pope left a medical group to establish an independent practice and added ancillary services, such as allergy and pulmonary labs and ultrasound screening, to ensure his financial viability. Former primary care physician Peter Anderson in Virginia turned his practice around by redesigning the office workflow, especially exam room processes. Healthcare Finance News (2/6) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  Health Policy & Legislation 
  • CMS seeks feedback on expanded use of clinical quality measures
    CMS is seeking feedback on ways to help doctors easily use clinical quality measures reported as part of other initiatives to help them meet the requirements for EHR meaningful use and the Physician Quality Reporting System. "We are requesting information from medical specialty societies, boards and registries; other third party registry vendors, eligible professionals using registries to report quality measures, and any other party interested in providing information on this request for information," according to the agency. Health Data Management (2/4) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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This news roundup is provided as a timely update to AAFP members and other health care professionals about family medicine topics in the news media. Links to articles are provided for the convenience of family physicians who may find them of use in discussions with patients or colleagues. Opinions expressed in AAFP SmartBrief are those of the identified authors and do not necessarily reflect the opinions or policies of the American Academy of Family Physicians. On occasion, media articles may include or imply incorrect information about the AAFP and its policies, positions or relationships. For clarification on AAFP positions and policies, we refer you to

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