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January 31, 2013
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Working to create positive images of girls and women in media and entertainment

  Gender In Media 
  • Presidential memorandum aims to boost gender equality globally
    President Barack Obama signed a Presidential Memorandum to provide for the continued promotion of gender equality. Under the order, the Secretary of State will pick an Ambassador at Large to lead the Global Women's Issues office, the White House blog reported. It also ensures that efforts between women's equality and the country's development goals are in sync and launches a group focused on international gender issues. The White House Blog (1/30) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Fonda, Steinem, Morgan campaign for female FCC chief
    Jane Fonda, Gloria Steinem and Robin Morgan are leading a call for President Barack Obama to appoint a female to head the Federal Communications Commission. "It's long past the time to close the gender gap in our nation's leadership and in the media and telecom industries' leadership," the three founders of Women's Media Center wrote in a petition featured on Change.org. U.S. News & World Report (1/24) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
Pat Croce Reveals His Insights for Acting on Your Passion
If you're ready to "get your butt off the couch and get into the game of life," it's time to get inspired by this successful entrepreneur and leadership expert. Read the featured article.

  Trends & Insights 
  • World leaders discuss the causes of gender inequality
    Gender inequality in the world economy was a topic of discussion at the World Economic Forum in Davos, Switzerland. Women account for a large percentage of college graduates but are underrepresented among the highest levels of company leadership. "It makes economic sense to improve the situation of women," said Christine Lagarde, managing director of the International Monetary Fund. "There are huge upsides." CBS MoneyWatch (1/25) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • By serving in combat, more women will rise in business
    The end of the military's ban on women in combat will likely lead more women veterans to enter the world of entrepreneurship, writes Bill Murphy Jr. "Opening the combat arms to women likely means more women will wind up serving in the military as a whole, so expect to see more female veterans launching new businesses in the years ahead," he writes. In addition, allowing women in combat will pave the way for women to take more leadership roles in the military and in the defense industry, he writes. Inc. online (free registration) (1/24) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  Ideas in Action 
  • Islamic women take to the sky in Afghanistan, Pakistan
    A joint effort between NATO and the Afghan Ministry of Defense is offering pilot training at Afghanistan's Shinhad Air Base. Lt. Nilofor Rhmani is one of five women in the training program. Pakistan has embraced new roles for women over the past several years, including preparing women as fighter pilots in the Pakistani Air Force. Flying online (1/28) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
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  SmartQuote 
I attribute my success to this: I never gave or took any excuse."
--Florence Nightingale,
British social reformer, nurse and statistician


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About Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media
Six years ago, while watching children's entertainment with her young daughter, Academy Award winner Geena Davis noticed a remarkable imbalance in the ratio of male to female characters. From that small starting point, Davis commissioned the largest research study ever undertaken on gender in children's entertainment. The research showed that in the top-grossing G-rated films, there were three male characters for every one female - a statistic that still has not improved. The Institute is the leading resource for gender in media research, trends and education for the entertainment industry and the public. The Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media and See Jane are a project of Community Partners.
 
About See Jane
See Jane is a program of the Institute that utilizes research, education and advocacy to engage the entertainment industry and recognize the need for gender balance and varied portrayals of females and male characters into movies, TV, and other media aimed at children 11 and under. We work cooperatively and collaboratively with entertainment creators to encourage them to be leaders in creating positive change.
 
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