Reading this on a mobile device? Try our optimized mobile version here: http://r.smartbrief.com/resp/enhlCfbwocfEmmudZsKA

March 13, 2013
Sign upForwardArchiveAdvertise
Social Studies – Preparing Students for College, Career and Civic Life

  Teaching & Learning 
  • Skype helps Okla., Tenn. students collaborate for Bill of Rights lesson
    A fifth-grade class in Oklahoma recently connected with eighth-graders in Tennessee via Skype for a lesson on the Bill of Rights. Students used the technology to participate in joint presentations on the topic, using PowerPoint, interactive whiteboards and classroom computers. The teachers found each other while doing online research on the topic and joined forces on the lesson, in which one class created slides demonstrating uses for the Bill of Rights, while the other created slides with background information and limitations. The Duncan Banner (Okla.) (3/12) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Mass. high school's mock trial team judges this year a success
    The mock trial program at Massachusetts' Natick High School started up again last year after a long hiatus brought on by a lack of interest. The school's team of 21 enthusiastic students took on the roles of prosecutors and defense attorneys during mock trials that were judged by real attorneys and judges in real courtrooms and administered by the Massachusetts Bar Association. "Constantly we hear lawyers say they couldn't have done what they did at their age," said Natick social studies teacher Cindy Crohan, one of the team's advisers. Patch.com/Natick, Mass. (3/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Other News
  Professional Development 
 
  • Gates: Why teachers should use technology to connect, collaborate
    Bill Gates used his recent keynote address at the SXSWedu Conference & Festival in Austin, Texas, to champion the use of social media and other technology to connect educators and allow them to learn from each other, SmartBrief's senior education editor, Melissa Greenwood, writes in this blog post. "The fact that these platforms let you categorize and talk about what your challenges are and sort of reach out to experts anywhere in the country who will be able to give you examples of what works with that type of student, it's really breaking down that isolation in a really strong way," Gates said. SmartBrief/SmartBlog on Education (3/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Teach Holocaust History with Echoes and Reflections
Echoes and Reflections is the leader in Holocaust education, providing teacher training programs across the U.S. Earn professional development credit and explore classroom-ready materials― lessons include maps, photos, primary source documents, visual history testimony, and connections to standards. Find a program today!
  Technology in the Classroom 
  • Students can go to Washington -- in a 3D game
    A new 3D multiplayer game, "Government in Action," is intended to help students who take American government courses to experience life as a U.S. representative. The game, launched by McGraw-Hill Education, was developed in collaboration with Muzzy Lane Software and Rep. John Tierney, D-Massachusetts. "The ability to interact rather than just reading a text in this technology-driven age will probably drive more interest," Tierney said. CNN (3/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Does BYOT put some students at a disadvantage?
    School districts nationwide have implemented bring-your-own-technology programs as a low-cost solution to providing students with one-to-one access to technology, writes former English teacher AJ Juliani. In this blog post, Juliani writes that such programs save districts money but could put students who don't have the resources at a disadvantage. Students, he writes, have varying levels of access to technology and proficiency in using the devices, particularly for academic purposes. SmartBrief/SmartBlog on Education (3/11) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 
  Social Studies & Civic Life 
  • N.J. students learn about genocide with One Million Bones project
    Students at Washington Township High School in New Jersey are sculpting clay to look like human bones as part of the One Million Bones project to raise awareness about genocide around the world. Social studies teacher Karen LaRosa recently took her students to the school art room to work on the bones, to be exhibited this summer in Washington, D.C. "The students in my classes just learned about the Holocaust. They have all researched one victim. As a tribute, the students engraved the victim's name on the skeletal sculpture they've created," LaRosa said. NJ.com (Hackensack, N.J.)/South Jersey Times (3/12) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • Helping students to change negative thinking
    Teaching students about the eight common "thought holes," or negatively skewed perceptions such as personalizing and jumping to conclusions, and giving them three steps to reason out of these cognitive patterns can build their emotional resilience, positive psychology consultant Renee Jain writes in this blog post. "Above all, they learn that one can choose which thoughts to focus on, and in this, there is power," Jain writes. Edutopia.org/Renee Jain's blog (3/8) LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
 
  NCSS Updates 
  • NCSS awards
    NCSS is accepting nominations and applications for the following 2012 awards and grants: Outstanding Social Studies Teacher of the Year; Grant for the Enhancement of Geographic Literacy; Award for Global Understanding; Larry Metcalf Exemplary Dissertation; Exemplary Research in Social Studies Award; Jean Dresden Grambs Distinguished Career Research Award; FASSE Christa McAuliffe Reach for the Stars Award; and FASSE-IA International Understanding Grants. Learn more about NCSS awards and grants. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
  • NCSS workshop helps participants use thoughtful teaching strategies
    In the workshop titled "Strengthening Social Studies Learning and Excellence in the Common Core using Practical, Engaging, Thoughtful Teaching Strategies," participants will build a learning community while learning 15 powerful and practical activities to foster active engagement, excitement, and enhanced thinking in the classroom. Through the experience of hands-on lessons, participants will model constructivist strategies in the areas of inquiry learning and substantive discussion, as well as reading, writing, and other creative processing activities. The workshop takes place July 31 to Aug. 2 at the University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee. Learn more and register. LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story
Learn more about NCSS ->Home  |  Membership  |  Get Involved!
Conferences  |  Resources  |  Press Room

 
Position Title Company Name Location
$125,000 Salary for Master Middle School TeachersTEP Charter SchoolNew York, NY
Chief Executive Officer The National Council of the United States Society of St. Vincent de Paul (SVdP)St. Louis, MO
Association Community EducCornell UniversityIthaca, NY
Full Professor (W2/W3) in the Anthropology of GlobalizationUniversity of CologneRhineland, Germany
PhysiologistStony Brook UniversityStony Brook, NY
Assistant Professor of Political ScienceColorado Christian UniversityLakewood, CO
Click here to view more job listings.

  SmartQuote 
Humor is an affirmation of dignity, a declaration of man's superiority to all that befalls him."
--Romain Gary,
French diplomat, novelist, film director and aviator


LinkedInFacebookTwitterEmail this Story

 
 
Subscriber Tools
   
Print friendly format  | Web version  | Search past news  | Archive  | Privacy policy

Advertise
Publisher, Education Group:   Joe Riddle   202-407-7857
Job Board:   Jackie Basso   (202) 407-7871
 
Read more at SmartBrief.com
 
 
 Recent NCSS SmartBrief Issues:   Lead Editor:   Trigie Ealey
Contributing Editor:   James Roland
   
Mailing Address:
SmartBrief, Inc.®, 555 11th ST NW, Suite 600, Washington, DC 20004
 
 
© 1999-2013 SmartBrief, Inc.®  Legal Information