February 21, 2013
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Leading Edge
Use tough love to keep your team on schedule
If your team keeps blowing deadlines, it doesn't help to keep quiet, writes Patty Azzarello. Public accountability and tracking not only show that being late is unacceptable, they usually result in more projects being on time. "It's not about coming down hard on someone or being disrespectful or nasty. It's about moving the business forward," Azzarello writes. Fast Company online (2/20)
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4 ways to praise your employees
Some bosses find it easy to be critical of failure but difficult to praise good work, writes Mary Jo Asmus. It's important to notice and celebrate small victories as well as milestones, Asmus argues. "A little bit of noticing and letting them know what you observe can go a long way, especially if you have a habit of being critical," she writes. Aspire-CS.com (2/18)
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Strategic Management
Foreign hackers are after your data, the White House warns
The White House is taking a tougher line with China and other countries over cyberattacks on U.S. firms, saying that widespread hacking is taking place and putting American companies at a disadvantage. "There are only two categories of companies affected by trade-secret theft: those that know they've been compromised and those that don't know it yet," Attorney General Eric Holder said. The Wall Street Journal (2/21)
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It's "weird" without Steve, says Apple chairman
It's "weird" to try and run Apple without having Steve Jobs around, says Chairman Arthur D. Levinson. The company keeps going, but Jobs' absence remains fresh. "I'm still not to the point where I walk into that boardroom and don't miss Steve. He was a one of a kind guy," Levinson says. CNNMoney/Fortune (2/20)
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Innovation and Creativity
How startups and small companies can innovate like a ninja
Ninjas were nimble and determined warriors who successfully fought more powerful enemies, says Gary Shapiro, head of the Consumer Electronics Association. That should serve as a model for corporate innovators, who need similar agility and resilience to bring products to market. "While the big companies are mired in bureaucracy, small businesses can be ninja innovators by being more agile," Shapiro says. Inc. online (free registration)/Tech Report blog (2/20)
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Want a better job? Improve the one you have
Innovators looking for a better job shouldn't jump ship too readily, writes Stefan Lindegaard. Few firms are increasing their innovation headcount, so it's better to stay put and focus on making your current gig more rewarding. "I know many very capable innovators who have been out of relevant jobs for years. This is not the time to take chances with your career," Lindegaard warns. 15Inno.com (Denmark) (2/20)
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The Global Perspective
France can have its "so-called workers," says U.S. exec
An American CEO has sparked outrage in France by saying that the country's "so-called workers" are so lazy that there's no point opening factories there. Titan International's Maurice "Morry" Taylor made the claim in a letter to the French industry minister. "The French workforce gets paid high wages but works only three hours. They get one hour for breaks and lunch, talk for three and work for three," he asserted. Reuters (2/20)
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Engage. Innovate. Discuss.
The 4 tenets of companies with a higher purpose
Companies exist for reasons besides earnings, argue Whole Foods CEO John Mackey and nonprofit co-founder Raj Sisodia in their book, "Conscious Capitalism." Companies must discover that higher calling, work on behalf of all stakeholders and have a self-aware, diligent sense of leadership and culture, Henna Inam writes. SmartBrief/SmartBlog on Leadership (2/19)
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Daily Diversion
Dolphins are not anonymous, researchers say
Wild dolphins call one another by name, researchers say. The creatures, which tailor whistles for specific acquaintances, are the first non-human species to be shown to use signature communications for one another. Wired.com (2/20)
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SmartQuote
I don't care if people like me."
-- Maurice "Morry" Taylor, CEO of Titan International, as quoted by Reuters
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