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October 19, 2012
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In the News 
 
  • Face transplant patient makes excellent progress, surgeon says
    A patient who received a scalp-to-neck face transplant at the University of Maryland Medical Center can smile, taste, smell and talk, and he is more comfortable going out in public. The patient "is exceeding my expectations this soon after his surgery, and he deserves a great deal of credit for the countless hours spent practicing his speech and strengthening his new facial muscles," said plastic surgeon Eduardo Rodriguez. The 36-hour surgery involved bones, muscles, nerves and skin. ABC News/Medical Unit blog (10/17), CNN (10/19) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
  • Dynamic duo see plastic surgery as a bonding adventure
    A mother and daughter who snorkel and helicopter around the world together saw concurrent plastic surgery as an opportunity to relax together for a few days. "The patients who start with a supportive relationship, they really help each other and I welcome that," said plastic surgeon Peter Fodor, who gave the mother a neck tuck and cheek fillers and the daughter a breast lift and abdominoplasty. Yahoo/ABC News (10/18) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
 
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Dr. Robert Zubowski on VECTRA® 3D
"VECTRA 3D has been extremely useful in helping me understand patient's expectations. And when you can educate them about what can and can't be accomplished, you're going to have a higher percentage of satisfied patients. It gives them a comfort level with the decision, and the fact that we've gone the extra mile to educate them enhances their whole experience."
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Robert Zubowski, M.D., Paramus, NJ
Practice Management 
 
  • Self-stigmatization prevents doctors from coming back to work
    U.K. researchers interviewed 19 doctors who were on a prolonged sick leave due to physical or mental health problems, or drug or alcohol problems, and found that self-stigmatization was a major obstacle preventing their return to work. Some respondents described themselves as failures and some feared a negative response when returning to work. The findings appear in the journal BMJ Open. DoctorsLounge.com/HealthDay News (10/18) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
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Dr. Stephen Mulholland Workshop in Orlando
Attend a full day workshop featuring Dr. Stephen Mulholland in Orlando, Florida on Saturday, December 15, 2012 - at no charge. Learn about the latest body shaping and fat grafting techniques, including live cases, video demos, and an interactive Q&A session. Click here to register!
Health Quality & Advocacy 
  • Twins help plastic surgeon's research in aesthetic factors
    Ohio plastic surgeon Hooman Soltanian took advantage of a local Twins' Day festival to research differences in aesthetic breast features. He asked women to participate in 2006 and 2007. "I was actually surprised at how many people agreed to do it," Soltanian said. One surprising finding was women who had breast-fed their babies had slightly better-looking breasts than those who had not. "The hormonal milieu during breast-feeding may be such that it can improve the quality of skin," he said. The Plain Dealer (Cleveland) (10/16) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
Plastic Surgery Channel Video Spotlight 
  • Fat no longer a bad word
      
    It used to be "fat" was a bad word, but new advancements in medical technology have opened the door for surgeons to use a patient's own fat to improve the looks of their face, breasts or even their buttocks. ThePlasticSurgeryChannel.com (10/19) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story

Research & Technology 
  • Blepharoplasty may increase the risk for dry eye
    Almost 27% of patients reported dry eye after blepharoplasty and 26% reported swelling of the eye, according to a study published in Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery. More aggressive surgical techniques and surgery on both the upper and lower lids increase the risk of dry eye, the researchers found. The study was based on an analysis of the records of 892 people treated by a single surgeon. Reuters (10/17) LinkedInFacebookTwitterGoogle+Email this Story
SmartQuote 
Not all those who wander are lost."
--J.R.R. Tolkien,
British writer, poet, philologist and professor

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